Second light fixture same switch


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Old 11-24-16, 07:47 PM
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Second light fixture same switch

I have a new house built in 2016. I have a hall closet with no light. I want to extend light switch with hall light to create a closet light too so when hall light is on, closet is on too.

This is the next step up in my learning. I've never installed a box where the wires meet the fixture. I think that part should be easy.

I'm confused on the splitting of the wires for existing light switch. I have all the tools but what additional hardware should I buy like wires?

Does it matter if the wire is too small for load?

I know with electrical outlets, you have two types: the end of the chain and everything else. So with a light fixture, if it's daisy chained to another thing, will splitting it a third way be an issue?

How do you pick the right box to mount to stud for fixture? I've replaced fixtures before and made the old box work, but is there some kind of code on it that tells me the type needed?

Really, I want to say thank you for any help. I'm tired of doing stuff wrong even after my research and want to do this for my wife as a gift. So again ty!
 
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Old 11-25-16, 12:16 AM
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Does it matter if the wire is too small for load?
Not if you have good fire insurance. A 15 amp breaker requires #14 wire minimum. A 20 amp breaker requires #12 wire minimum.
I want to extend light switch with hall light to create a closet light too so when hall light is on, closet is on too.
First you must determine if power comes in at the light or the switch. If at the switch box you have two black wires on the switch and two or more whites connected to only each other power probably comes in at the switch. If you have a black and white wire on the switch power comes in at the light.
so when hall light is on, closet is on too.
Why? Wouldn't it be better to have it on its own switch the way it is normally done?
How do you pick the right box to mount to stud for fixture?
Easiest just to use an old work box that clamps to the Sheetrock. Why do you write stud? Light fixtures usually go on the ceiling. Studs are in walls.

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Last edited by Tolyn Ironhand; 11-25-16 at 06:58 AM. Reason: Fixed typo
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Old 11-25-16, 04:01 AM
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In addition to Ray's comments, be aware of where you can locate a light fixture in a closet. It may not be an incandescent fixture (even if you plan on using CFL's, etc.) if it is within 12" vertically from combustibles (clothes hanging, etc.) Your best bet is to install a 12" mini fluorescent light with cover on the overhead wall above the door.

I, too would run a cable from a nearby receptacle to a switch and then to the light, allowing separate switching. How wide and deep is the closet?
 
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Old 11-25-16, 04:41 AM
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To add: A fluorescent light such as Larry suggested often doesn't need a junction box. The connection is made inside the light.
 
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Old 11-25-16, 06:11 AM
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This will be a lot easier if you can work in the attic.
Use the same cable as was there. A 15amp cable is #14, a 20amp cable is #12 and usually yellow.

The easiest way to do this is run a cable from the existing light to your new box.
Connect the white and black from your new cable to the existing white and black wires that feed the light fixture.
 
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Old 11-25-16, 08:30 AM
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Wow ty all so far with replies. I'm so excited to do this.

I would add a new switch but thought I'd have to tear into drywall to make it happen? I have a guide thing I bought at Lowe's a few years ago that is supposed to help with guiding wires but never used it. It's on a spindle deal.

I called it stud but meant the beam. I remember some instructions saying to install it to the wood but I don't have to? That makes a lot of sense if I don't.

I have easy access in the attic to said area so I had planned on doing that. If it's not hard to do a switch, I may do that. Another option I thought is a fluorescent type light with an on off so it won't come on every time. I'll add pictures to show.
 
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Old 11-25-16, 08:40 AM
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The closet is over 2 feet deep by a foot and a half wide. It's about 8-9 ft tall.Name:  20161125_103257.jpg
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I'm showing looking into hallway with master on left and standing in master doorway looking at thermostat, switch and light.
 
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Old 11-25-16, 08:41 AM
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thought I'd have to tear into drywall to make it happen?
No. you can usually just fish.
I have easy access in the attic to said area
So no problem.
I remember some instructions saying to install it to the wood
Don't believe everything you read on the Internet and take anything said by a BigBox employee with a grain of salt.
 
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Old 11-25-16, 09:41 AM
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A closet normally has a shelf 12" deep. You would not be able to install an incandescent fixture and meet the 12" clearance requirements. You might be able to install a fluorescent. Over the door sides like the best option.
 
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Old 11-25-16, 01:22 PM
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You also could look at the led light strips and there are smaller puck lights they make for cabinets and closets as well. Just a thought
 
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Old 11-25-16, 06:13 PM
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that is supposed to help with guiding wires but never used it. It's on a spindle deal.
It sounds like you have fish tape, a thin steel tape on a reel.
I would recommend you purchase fiberglass glow-rods for fishing, they make the job much easier and you might have no problem running a switch or anything else.
 
 

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