how tight to screw candelabra without brass tabs?


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Old 12-24-16, 05:36 PM
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how tight to screw candelabra without brass tabs?

Our ceiling fan uses candelabra and the bulbs go out every month. I've read that screwing them too tight is usually the cause and that it flattens the brass tab. These sockets don't seem to have a tab. Is that common or am I just not seeing it? How tight should they be screwed in?
 
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Old 12-24-16, 06:06 PM
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Can you get a ciear picture of the inside of the socket?
 
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Old 12-24-16, 06:28 PM
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Here is a pic. Have you seen these before? Name:  socket.jpg
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Size:  14.7 KB
 
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Old 12-24-16, 07:09 PM
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Have you seen these before
No but maybe the pros have.
 
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Old 12-24-16, 08:50 PM
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I've seen that type, not sure where. If the filaments are burning out it could be due to power fluctuations, vibration, or a lot of turning the lights on and off. Have you tried LED bulbs? They are still a bit pricey in special sizes/shapes, but I'd say it's either that or get a new light kit that allows different bulbs.

It also depends on the age and type of fan and switch. If you have a newer fan with a remote, LEDs may not work. Same with the wall switch. If it's a dimmer you may need to replace it as well. Even if the switches are on/off, the current limiter in newer fans can cause issues.

I have older fans with just an on/off switch and the LED's work great for me.
 

Last edited by Gunguy45; 12-25-16 at 01:47 AM.
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Old 12-25-16, 12:51 AM
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vibration, that can be in some applications the cause of shot life. If they are burning out frequently then give the LED's a shop, your spending money replacing the convention bulbs anyway.
 
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Old 12-25-16, 07:38 AM
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I may try LED. However, I am still unsure how tight to screw bulbs in. Would my assumption be correct that they must be pretty snug since there is no brass tab in these? I've been leaving them rather loose imo. Thinking I should tighten them but wanted to ask first in case I damaged something.
 
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Old 12-25-16, 02:44 PM
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Snug and fully seated is all you should need. The base of the bulb is rounded enough that it should contact the tab. Just like the + terminal of an AAA, or AA, C, D battery touches the contact. Bulbs should never be "loose" since that can make a bad contact leading to arcing at the terminal or exacerbate any vibration. I find that applying just a touch of bulb grease (yes, there is such a thing) to the threads helps them reach correct tightness and they are easier to remove.
 

Last edited by Gunguy45; 12-25-16 at 03:16 PM.
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Old 12-25-16, 02:57 PM
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I'd imagine your problem is predominately crap bulbs.

The tip of the bulb socket is usually lead and will seat itself without overtightening.

I wouldn't try in LED bulbs until it could be confirmed that the fan will work with them.
Many fans state "incandescent bulbs"" only.
 
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Old 12-25-16, 03:21 PM
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I also agree with Pete about the bulbs you are currently using. Do they specifically say fan usage? Those normally have heavier duty filaments, like garage door opener bulbs.

Also, are they burning out the filaments? You can normally see it vibrate or a quick check with a meter will confirm.
 
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Old 12-25-16, 03:39 PM
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Okay LED is not option per manual. The bulbs I have are satco.... Not sure the quality of those...

Anyway, just realized they weren't burnt out. When I went to change them, they turned back on when I went to remove them (one of them anyway, other was already removed)I am thinking I put them in too loose.

Just put two brand new in for good measure to see how long they last and I put them in tighter than the previous sets. I might look for that lube. Would any household grease work such as vaseline?
 
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Old 12-25-16, 08:05 PM
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No, vasoline and similar will not work. Too low a melting point.

The grease is not vital, just next time you are out pick up a tube, it will last forever. Nice to have and it will avoid having to use a potato to remove a broken bulb. It is good to use it on any external fixtures you may have.

As to type of bulbs, I dunno if those are cheap or quality.
 
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Old 12-26-16, 03:51 AM
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Satco bulbs are made by Philips. Or should I say owned by the Phillips lighting. Yes, they are cheaper built bulb.
 
 

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