SPT-1 wire hardwired


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Old 01-12-17, 08:05 PM
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SPT-1 wire hardwired

More of a opinion or just some knowledge. When I moved into my place there was some swag style pendant lights with chains and such hooked up to the bedroom light junction box and controlled by the main light switch dimmer. A friend who is a contractor said I should remove them due to safety and code.
Now this is where I am maybe a bit confused on code or safety. I bought a pendant light from store. And low and behold the instructions tell me to hook up the SPT-1 wires from light socket hardwired into ceiling and main electrical wires from house. I thought it was mostly used on lamp cords and such. The swag lights I have are spt 1 and spt 2 wires so it must be fine right? Sorry the one pic if you zoom on wire just says spt 1 on it
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Old 01-12-17, 08:12 PM
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SPT-1 and SPT-2 are almost identical cords. Both rated for approx 7A and for lamp use.
SPT-2 has slightly heavier insulation.

If it is a part of a UL approved/inspected fixture then it is ok to use.
Most chandeliers and swag lamps use the same wire.
 
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Old 01-13-17, 03:00 AM
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Yes I've repaired quite a few lamps of my mom's and built quite a few also. The spt2 is thicker and not as easy to fit through some of the same openings as spt1. I just wasn't 100 percent sure it was okay to be hardwired. But if it came with the pendant light then it must be. I've just read on net and forums that typically spt 1 and 2 wires wasn't hardwired I guess
 
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Old 01-13-17, 04:42 AM
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I don't know how else you would wire them. You definitely can't use plug and receptacle, so your only option is to hardwire them. As you know the wire with the ribs is the neutral.
 
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Old 01-14-17, 02:54 AM
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What I find a little frustrating is you can hardwire it from the box or store but if i cut the plug off another one with same wire and parts it shouldn't be done. I just dont understand the reasoning.
 
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Old 01-14-17, 04:26 AM
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I don't understand where that logic came from. Can you quote a source for it? Certainly the wiring and plug are UL certified as a unit, but cutting the plug off and hardwiring in a ceiling box is not prohibited.
 
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Old 01-14-17, 12:46 PM
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The reasoning is this: The NRTL tag is applied after testing and is for the entire assembly. Altering the assembly, and cutting off the plug IS altering the assembly, voids the original testing and therefore the listing.

Any time a NRTL (Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory) listed item is modified, no matter how slight the modification, the listing is then void as it is not the same item that was originally tested. Some inspectors are absolute sticklers for EVERYTHING to be NRTL listed before they will approve the entire installation.
 
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Old 01-14-17, 02:05 PM
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I agree with the NRTL testing and approval, but "what if" you happen to break the fragile hard plastic plug on the end? Do you scrap the entire fixture, or replace the plug? I have never heard of an inspector that had any say so in what fixture was installed post CO in residential work.
 
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Old 01-14-17, 03:32 PM
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Do you want the "official" answer or the real world answer? Officially, you would have to replace the entire cord and plug with one identical (probably meaning from the same manufacturer) as the original. Just adding a replacement plug would not restore it to the original condition.

Of course the real world answer is to simply replace the plug.

In the case of a hanging lamp you would have to buy one that did not have a plug as cutting off the plug voids the NRTL listing. Likewise, if you were going to plug the lamp into a receptacle you would have to buy the same lamp but this time with the plug attached.

Stupid and illogical? I think so but that IS the absolute letter of the law explanation. Again, in the real world you would either cut off the plug or add one and no one but some anal-retentive power hungry inspector would even care.


I have often read that insurance inspectors will look for "anything" to avoid paying a claim and that using non-NRTL approved electrical items are a prime source of blame used in denying claims. BUT, I have never heard this from a bona-fide insurance company representative. In fact, I HAVE read and heard that insurance DOES cover "stupid" actions by homeowners (and drivers) every day of the week.

I don't know how common it is today but 20-30 years ago there were companies that rebuilt flame safeguard controls for boilers and furnaces. The people that sold the "remanufactured" controls swore they were just as good as the original but cost about half as much as a "new" unit. Upon careful inspection however you would notice the "remanufactured" units had the NRTL labels missing. The people selling the genuine, NRTL listed new controls made a point telling me that the remanufactured units did NOT have the NRTL listing and therefore IF there was a failure that caused property loss that the insurance would NOT pay the claim because a non-listed control was used. I was never in a situation where I could test the theory.
 
 

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