Is this a parallel circuit? Have a few questions.


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Old 02-24-17, 07:23 AM
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Is this a parallel circuit? Have a few questions.

Thanks in advance for your help. I'm wiring a multi-bulb table lamp with limited space for wiring. The attached diagram may work but I don't know if it's a sound design. Have I drawn a parallel circuit? Are those appropriate for table lamps? Okay to use wire nuts at each split? Any safety concerns? Any help is appreciated.Name:  wiring diagram.jpg
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Old 02-24-17, 07:28 AM
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I'm not an electrician. But, your design is sound. Wire nuts are OK. The main concern is the enclosure, that is important.
 
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Old 02-24-17, 07:42 AM
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Thanks. Each split will be in a drilled out hole in wood and then the hole will be covered with felt so the splices are not accessible without removing the felt.
 
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Old 02-24-17, 07:52 AM
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If this is a test stand or experiment then I think you're OK. But if this meant as a permanent fixture then you need metal enclosure.
There are experts here who can better advise you. Wait for their response.
 
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Old 02-24-17, 08:46 AM
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I see what you mean. My copy of the UL requirements for lamps is old (2002) but I found what you're talking about...

"9.5 A part such as a splice, a tap, a wire, a transformer, a capacitor, a ballast, a current-carrying part, or a device with an exposed live part shall be contained in an enclosure constructed of metal, glass, ceramic, porcelain, or polymerical material during normal maintenance and use."

Strangely though it goes on to say "30.6 When the material through which the cord or wiring passes is wood, porcelain, phenolic composition, or other insulating material, not less tan 3/64 inch (1.2 mm) thick, a smoothly rounded surface is determined to be equivalent to a bushing."

It even gives a temperature rating for using wood as the interior surface of your enclosure (90 C).

And oddly enough felt seems to be okay. "Exception No. 6: A wire or cord with a minimum 1/32 inch (0.79 mm) thermoplastic insulation and an insulation-piercing or a crimp connector having all live parts of the connector and the conductors insulated are only required to be housed within the unit such that they are unable to be grasped, pulled, or inadvertently snagged. For instance, it meets the intent of the requirement to have a metal base with a felt pad for a bottom cover where the felt pad is secured by an adhesive and the weight of the unit."

This is so confusing. If I have to house the wire connections inside an enclosure that is not wood, I'll have to scrap the design entirely. Space is so limited there's no way I can find and install 4 "boxes" that will fit. Unfortunately I can't think of any other way to wire this sucker.
 
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Old 02-24-17, 09:14 AM
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Unless those push-in style connectors would satisfy the requirement... I don't suppose those would take the place of an approved enclosure? Even though they're located inside a wooden enclosure? Lol
 
 

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