Installing remote wireless switch

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-27-17, 12:50 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Installing remote wireless switch

acegoo Wireless Lights Switch Kit, Quick to Relocate light swtich

I wanted to confirm the installation process. I am not an electrician, but I usually can figure stuff out, this is something I was hoping to get some help with confirming so I don't screw this up.

I have attached some photos to help with what I am seeing.

I think.....
Transmitters Red wire goes to the black hot wire
Transmitters Brown wire goes to the blue wire
Transmitters blue wire maybe goes inside the crimped white wires.

The confusing thing is that one would assume blue to blue, but in this case that may be wrong. Can you just look through my photos and help me out with this.
Thanks
DupstaName:  lightSwitch.jpg
Views: 1123
Size:  33.9 KBName:  directions02.jpg
Views: 1115
Size:  29.5 KBName:  transmitter.jpg
Views: 1096
Size:  27.6 KBName:  connectors.jpg
Views: 1033
Size:  25.1 KBName:  specs01.jpg
Views: 1051
Size:  29.1 KBName:  transmitter03.jpg
Views: 1062
Size:  23.4 KBName:  neutrals.jpg
Views: 1027
Size:  28.4 KBName:  hotLead.jpg
Views: 1014
Size:  33.7 KBName:  transmitter02.jpg
Views: 2018
Size:  39.1 KBName:  directions.jpg
Views: 1059
Size:  26.7 KB
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-27-17, 12:59 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Transmitters blue wire maybe goes inside the crimped white wires.
Yes. The wire colors on the switch correspond to UK not U.S wire colors.
 
  #3  
Old 04-27-17, 02:52 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I was hoping someone could chime in on if the way I am going to do this, as explained in my photos is the correct way. The neutral thing here is interesting and not super clear to me. It seems that there are some white wires all bunched together. So just wanted to determine if I am suppose to un crimp those and stick my blue into that.
I was hoping for some clarity. I have never done this, so I was just reaching out for some help on procedure, as at the end of the day I am not totally sure and donít want to mess anything up here.
 
  #4  
Old 04-27-17, 03:02 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
So just wanted to determine if I am suppose to uncrimp those and stick my blue into that.
Cut the wires and restrip. Add the switch blue and connect all together with a wire nut. You really need to either wrap the blue wire with white tape or slip white heat shrink tubing over it. That's at least closer to code. Does that switch have a UL rating? Did you get it off Ebay?
 
  #5  
Old 04-27-17, 04:23 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
OK, I will go for it and wrap the blue wire in white.
Here are the specs. I am not sure what "UL" is, maybe under load? So like 15amps? I am going to hopefully run this so that I can turn my kitchen lights on with this remote switch now.
Seems to have fine reviews? Google "acegoo Wireless Lights Switch Kit"
This is just not my everyday thing, but I have wired and soldered electrical cords in the past with electronics, but never done house wiring, I can work my way around this, the colors are just throwing me off. Electricty is no joke so trying to do my due dilegence, turn off the circuit breaker and go from there.


Features:
- support lights like halogen/incandescent/CFL/fluorescent/LED lights, etc.
- remote receiver support standard 10 amp, resistive load max 16 amp.
- encrypted signal connection, no RF interference problem between switches.
- up to 260 feet transmission distance outdoor, 100 feet for indoor use.
- battery-free kinetic switch, water resistance, more than 20 years lifetime.

Technical Spec
Voltage Input Range: AC 85-265V 50/60 Hz
Amp loads: 10A standard 15A max
Operate Frequency: 433MHz
 
  #6  
Old 04-27-17, 04:41 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 52,589
Received 337 Votes on 315 Posts
UL = Underwriters Listing.

We, in the United States, have some of the most stringent testing methods applied to electrical devices. The devices that receive the UL seal of approval are usually the best you can get and are the safest to use.

There are other testing companies worldwide but nothing like UL.

Devices that carry no seal of approval have not been tested for safety and usually means you are on your own.

Many devices from Asia don't carry any type of seal.
 
  #7  
Old 04-27-17, 04:57 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the explanation info. Good to know.
CE FCC approved, With Manufacturer is now applying for UL certificate, need several months to accomplish. I assume this is BS as they will never get it.
Should I not use this item?
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: