what does "Use 60 watt lamp max" mean for dual socket ceiling light fixture?


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Old 06-14-17, 06:02 PM
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what does "Use 60 watt lamp max" mean for dual socket ceiling light fixture?

I have a ceiling light fixture that says "Warning Risk of Fire Use 60 Watt Lamp Max". The light fixture has 2 sockets. My question is: Does the warning mean 60 watt lamp/lightbulb for each socket or, surely not, for the two sockets combined; which would be a 30W lightbulb in each socket.

I have been using in each socket a Light Bulb Socket Splitter that I got from Amazon.com. This is the Amazon page:

https://www.amazon.com/Maxxima-Light...ulbs+Pack+of+3

What these do is enable a single socket to hold two bulbs instead of one. I have been using 4 CFL T2 Spiral lightbulbs rated at 23 Watts (equal to 100W incandescent bulb) at 1600 lumens.

It seems my light fixture suddenly stopped completely, and someone is saying I should have LED bulbs instead of the CFLs I'm using. Does this make any sense? And also, that the light fixture wasn't capable of handling the 4 CFLs, and the light fixture needed to be changed.

The adapters I purchased, and have been using now since August of 2015 (with the CFL bulbs), say they are for LED, CFL, and Standard bulbs.

Later, this 'someone' said the problem is the light switch, and would change it soon.

Are LED bulbs better because they burn less 'hot'? Are they a lot more expensive, I'm wondering. And is it ok to use these adapters with my 4 CFLs for this type light fixture?
 
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Old 06-14-17, 06:39 PM
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The "60 watt lamp max" is the rating of each socket.

I can not see the light fixture you are referring to, but the light fixture stopping to work is likely not caused by using the adapters and 4 - 23 watt CFL's. However, depending on the fixture, it might not be a good idea to use the adapters as the light fixture was not designed for them.
The cause of the failure could be ( but not limited to):
Bad switch
loose connection at switch or fixture
damaged socket due to adapter use.

LED's run cooler then incandescent and even CFL's. They use less energy (watts), and start at full brightness. While they are more expensive then incandescent and CFL's they have come down in price quite a bit and will pay for themselves with the energy saved. If the fixture is used a lot, the payback will be faster.
 
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Old 06-14-17, 07:07 PM
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Yes you can use 2 60w incandescent or 2 100W equivalent CFL or LED per adapter. I have a similar setup as you in 2 sockets in my garage. It's a rental, so I didn't want to go to the expense or trouble of installing tube florescents. I figure 6400 lumens per fixture is plenty, though I could add a few more by using a different configuration. I even have a few pull chain on/off adapters in line and one pull chain porcelain socket so I can adjust it from all 8 down to just 2 or any combination of two.

I have not switched to LEDs in the garage yet (though I would like to to eliminate buzz in my stereo) because I can't justify the price. Cheapest around here (in the color temp I want) is at HD and it's about $23 for just 4 bulbs. You could probably find them cheaper online.

When they clearanced out the 100W instant-on daylight CFLs, I bought 2 boxes of 4 ea for about $8 ea, and then 2 more boxes when they dropped to $2.50. And this was after I'd filled the fixtures already. So I think those 16 bulbs should last me til I'm dead. Haven't had a single one burn out yet, and only one out of the many I bought was bad out of the box.

I will tell you this, those adapters are very cheaply made and rely solely on friction connections for all the contact points. I don't think they make a quality adapter. The worse connections arc each time they are turned on and eventually will not conduct. I found this out when one that was working fine suddenly stopped. When I started to loosen it, heard an arc and it worked again. Left it like that for a month or 2 then it quit again. Finally took it apart cleaned up the contact points, crimped, bent, mutilated them til they had good contact. Put a bit of antioxidation paste on and they seem much more reliable. No snaps, no sizzles. Yeah, I know, now they aren't UL approved, but they work.

Remember, each adapter is rated 2 x 60, but what are they screwed in to? That should be rated at 120W min. Though I really doubt there would be any problem going over slightly, because of the much lower heat generated. LEDs would be no concern since both their wattage and heat are so much less...if you feel like spending the money.
 
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Old 06-14-17, 07:11 PM
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It means that the maximum heat rating for the lamp holders and their wires is equivalent to the heat from a 60 watt incandescent bulb.

Now if this is a light kit on a fan it could have a current limiter that failed.
 
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Old 06-15-17, 03:38 AM
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I'm surprised by the response from our members on this. Although it's not "unsafe" using those adapters, it's like using a multi-tap on one outlet. The tap in of itself is not a safety issue, What's plugged in can be. Those adapters leave it wide open to easily overload the fixture. As Vic as found out, they are not well made. The fixture was made to fit one 60 watt bulb in each socket. You void any and all electrical code approvals and possibly a loss in insurance coverage in the event of a fire due to that fixture.

Don't use them. Buy the proper fixture for the need you have.
 
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Old 06-15-17, 08:40 AM
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Norm, not to argue but I'd need to see some proof, code, or certified opinion on that. 60W bulb load is a 60W bulb load all day. I don't think that matters if it comes from 10-6W bulbs or 6-10W bulbs. Current will be the same, heat will be less. In fact, I imagine heat will be much less since it moves the bulbs further away from the socket and fixture wiring (at least in my case).

More fixtures are probably overloaded just by people using 100W bulbs (Well, not anymore I guess. Can you even buy those now?).

Of course I wouldn't plug in a cobbled together self built string of junk. That would be an issue in the event of fire, but standard off the shelf UL items and any insurance company or inspector would have a hard time in court from me.
 
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Old 06-15-17, 02:49 PM
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Vic, no proof necessary (and no argument from me either ). You are correct, 60 watts in any configuration is 60 watts and falls in the recommend range of the fixture. If that is in fact what a person does.

However, I've been called out on several occasions on this forum (not by you necessarily) for making assumptions that the OP or others will in fact adhere to the specs for a recommended item.

Suppose a person asked if using 14 gauge wire is OK on a 20 amp circuit breaker. Provided only a an item that won't exceed the wire rating limit is used. Would you be OK with that? I hope not.

It's no different than overloading an outlet tap and using many, many lights from that same tap. Gee the lamps themselves won't exceed the power consumption, but a bunch of others on that same circuit may in fact exceed the breaker rating. Example...Saturday backyard garage mechanic using several halogen lamps to light his garage and who knows what power tools all on the same circuit.

As far as the light fixtures concerned, those little labels very often get dry and fall out. It's not too far a stretch to find somebody who thinks it's OK to put in perhaps two 60 watt bulbs in each of those two adapters. And yes I think a UL listed item that uses an adapter to increase it's output over the recommended use will in fact void warranty and maybe insurance if that item was found to cause a fire. Remember, insurance companies are not in business to pay out claims but to take in premiums. They will mitigate any possible way to prevent payment. Why do you think deductibles tend to be right at the borderline of typical insurance claims?

The assumption is he won't do it. You know what that gets you? A guy who does it and sooner or later gets burnt.

Again I make an issue only because I have been call out on assuming anything.

To the OP and others, buy the proper fixture for the right use.
 
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Old 06-16-17, 04:54 AM
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OP here. I hate when opinions don't agree, but am glad to here a vote of confidence that it is ok to use these adapters (with the proper wattage).

I might say that the building I'm in is old. I don't know what decade it was built, but maybe 30's, 40's, or 50's. So, the wiring is old. All the outlets are old, and have no ground wire. They are all the two-prong outlet type, which is very annoying. This building is a single level, 16 or so units of SROs (single room occupancy) spaces. I hope to be moving to something more up to date in the coming months.

Thanks for all the input.
 
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Old 06-16-17, 11:32 AM
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maybe 30's, 40's, or 50's. So, the wiring is old
Old wiring is only rated for 60. Most new light fixtures require 90 wire.
 
 

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