bulb size


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Old 08-03-17, 06:32 AM
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bulb size

My laundry rm has 2 mini can lights. The label in the housing states 40 watt max for the bulb. I had to replace one and the smallest I had was 43 watts. Does 3 watts make any difference? I don't know if it's because the 40 is old or not but the 43 watt is noticeably brighter.
 
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Old 08-03-17, 06:44 AM
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Are we talking about an incandescent bulb or a CFL? I don't think that it would cause a problem. Ray would know better.
 
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Old 08-03-17, 06:51 AM
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It's halogen that looks like an incandescent bulb [which is what it replaced]
 
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Old 08-03-17, 06:59 AM
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Halogen bulbs ARE incandescents. They have a small amount of halogen gas (probably iodine) inside that decreases the "evaporation" of the tungsten filament. They still run as hot, if not hotter, than conventional incandescents.

I would suggest that you use a twisty CFL bulb or one of the latest LED bulbs that look like an old-fashioned incandescent. I bought some LED bulbs at Wally*World last Monday that are rated at 800 lumens (equivalent to a 60 watt incandescent) and having a color temperature of about 4500k or so-called "warm white". I don't know about your area but a box of six was about $3.97 although that price was underwritten by the local electric utility.
 
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Old 08-03-17, 07:02 AM
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Why a CFL? He wants to see. 3 watts can't make that much of a difference.
 
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Old 08-03-17, 07:10 AM
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Hey, I don't care if I can see good in the laundry rm but my wife is a bit fussier when she does laundry. While I'm allowed to do my laundry sometimes I'm on strict orders not to wash her clothes

Whether not the extra 3 watts makes a difference with the wiring or trim is what I'm concerned about. I assume they figure in some wiggle room with the specs but don't know enough about lighting.
 
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Old 08-03-17, 07:28 AM
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You state this is a "mini can light" and from that I read it as being a recessed fixture. In this case it is ALL about heat, heat trapped in the can that can cause deterioration in the electrical insulation of the wiring as well as other possible problems. The maximum wattage figure is one that testing has proven is not a problem PROVIDED the fixture was installed according to the manufacturer's instructions.

Using an incandescent bulb with a higher watt rating WILL make more heat for the fixture. I can't state for a fact that "only" three watts more is safe nor can I state as a fact it will cause your house to burn down but why even chance it? A twisty CFL with equivalent light output will have a fraction of the watt rating and will output a fraction of the heat compared to an incandescent. The LED bulbs I referred to have a color similar to incandescents, often preferred by women, yet uses only 9 watts while providing 800 lumens of light. Using the lumens figure is the ONLY way to compare the light output of different technologies, the watts figure being ONLY a measure of the electrical power used by the lamp.
 
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Old 08-03-17, 07:33 AM
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As stated previously the only reason I installed the 43 watt was because I didn't have a 40. It's no big deal to change it out after I go to town and buy more bulbs. Just trying to figure out if it's necessary.
 
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Old 08-03-17, 07:40 AM
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Of course your wife wants to see & it's a good idea that do the best you can to help her see, if you don't want to do the laundry yourself. I'll go out on a limb & say that the 3 watts won't make a difference.
 
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Old 08-03-17, 07:50 AM
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You may, of course, do whatever you desire (and your wife allows ). I doubt there would be any problem if the light was only used for five minutes but if it were left on for five hours it might be a different story.

Personally, I cannot think of ANY situation where I would use a 40 watt (or 43 watt) incandescent lamp. I have a mix of incandescent, CFL, conventional (tube-type) fluorescent and LED lamps throughout my house. I have some small LEDs I use for night lights in the kitchen and bathroom, some incandescent reflectors in recessed fixtures, some LED bulbs in recessed fixtures and some small (50 watt) reflectors in track lighting.

I like LOTS of light although I don't particularly like high electrical bills. The lights I have on the longest are mostly fluorescents and LEDs. Lights I rarely use are mostly still incandescents. I try to buy the new tech lights when they are on sale or when one of the local electrical utilities has underwritten a low cost at the retail stores. The long life is an added plus.
 
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Old 08-03-17, 11:39 AM
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We prefer to use incandescents, my wife likes that type of light and I like the cost per bulb but those days are gone I also use 40 watt bulbs [now fluorescent] in the ceiling fan over the bed. With 3 bulbs it gives plenty of light. Except in the winter [when I don't have a fire] my light bill is fairly low which makes me doubt there would a substantial savings with more expensive bulbs.

The diagram in the can housing lists 2 types of 40 watt bulbs [17 and 19 ?] with a picture of an incandescent bulbs. It also has a picture of a flood bulb with letters [might be number too] which can be 60 watt. I don't know what the numbers/letters mean so I've always used regular 40 watt incandescent bulbs.



Ok, I pulled the trim to get the exact numbers the light is not supposed to exceed;
40 w R-16
40 w A-19
50 w PAR-20
50 w R-20

I have no idea what these numbers mean. I had the instructions that came with it 25 yrs ago but don't remember just what it said other than I knew or thought I was fine using any 40 watt.
 
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Old 08-03-17, 12:40 PM
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It has been my experience that most women do not like the new technology bulbs because of the color shift from their (in my opinion, superior) bluish light. The only exception was when using full spectrum fluorescent bulbs that were so close to daylight my wife would often forget to turn them off, thinking it was daylight coming through the windows.

It was, and is, for this reason that manufacturers came out with cooler temperature color bulbs, the "warm white" being the most common. LED bulbs are also available with the cooler temperature colors. Look on the box for the color temperature and the bulbs with the higher numbers, 6,000k will be close to daylight where the ones with less than 4,000k will be closer to the old incandescents.

As for your numbers/letters...
40 w R-16 This is a 40 watt incandescent with a reflector globe to direct all the light away from the base. The -16 refers to the physical size, I think the length of the neck but it could be the diameter, I don't know the absolutes just off hand.

40 w A-19 This is a standard 40 watt incandescent. The A-19 denotes a pear-shaped standard neck length bulb. This is the most common style of incandescent bulb.

50 w PAR-20 This is 50 watt reflector bulb where the reflector is in a parabolic shape. It has a little bit better control over the "beam spread" of light and can be had in either a spot or flood configuration. PAR bulbs are made with heavier glass than straight R bulbs and are often used in outdoor fixtures because the glass is much stronger.

50 w R-20 This is a fifty watt version of a reflector bulb. The -20 denotes a bit difference in size from the -16, I think it has to do with the diameter of the reflector, most likely in millimeters.

Generally speaking you want to use R or PAR bulbs in recessed fixtures to have all the available light being directed downward. As for cost, always wait until the new tech lamps are on sale or the cost is subsidized by the utility.

Shortly after moving to my present home I installed a photocell to control the lighting on the front of my house. Three lamps with each taking a 60 watt bulb. I was lucky to get four months life from any one bulb so I started using CFLs with a 60 watt equivalent light output, either 9 or 11 watts each. Depending on things I can't identify I get anywhere from a year to four years usage out of every bulb now. (I write the date on the bulb when I change it.) I was able to get a six-pack of 11 watt CFLs at Sam's Club a year or two ago for a dollar, the cost underwritten by the Seattle electric utility. Unfortunately, I have no idea where I put them so I had to buy those LED bulbs from Wal*Mart the other day. Anyway, when I changed from the regular incandescents to the CFLs my electric billing dropped about $2.50 a month and THAT was about ten percent of my total bill at the time. Even today my monthly billing is about 40% of what is considered "average" in the system.
 
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Old 08-03-17, 01:07 PM
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Furd, thanks for explaining the numbers. I think maybe that info was in the instructions and since the only part I really understood was a regular 40 watt, I ran with that.

Unless someone chimes in with a definite ok for the 43 watt bulbs I'll replace it with a curly cue bulb next chance I get. We went to town today but I didn't get to stop anywhere I could get bulbs, somehow I got elected to take my wife and her 2 oldest sons out for chinese. Not sure what to make of my fortune cookie, it said an admirer will soon let you know how much he cares for you ??? my wife thought that was funny!
 
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Old 08-03-17, 04:16 PM
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The LED bulbs I referred to have a color similar to incandescents, often preferred by women,
Where did you find that gem?

Most of the women I talk to and advise what kind of bulb to buy (especially the LED's) want 5000k and above for working areas. My wife thought I was hero several weeks ago when I put in a 5000k led in the closet. Said she can now pick out here cloths without fear of them looking wrong outside.

I advise most people to consider 5000K and above in the sewing room, kitchen work area, work bench, garage and laundry area. Use the 2700K range in the eating or dinning area, living room (TV) and bedroom. Maybe the outside porch light also.

When I sell paint to people, mainly the women I always ask what room it will be in and what kind of natural lighting might be available via windows. I then use a light box with a 2700K bulb and a 5000K bulb and tell them to put the swatch under each one. You'd be amaze at how they change their mind from "incandescent to daylight" temp.
 
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Old 08-03-17, 07:10 PM
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5000K is the closest light to daylight (IE: the light from the sun) you can get. It is the standard light used in the printing industry for viewing printed material. Most of the time I tell people to stay to 3500K or lower for general home use. They will give the nice warm glow they are used to. For other areas like work rooms, etc going to a higher color is ok.

@ Marksr - I doubt you will have an issue with the slightly higher wattage lamp in your can. If it is too hot the thermal switch will turn the can on and off. Then you will know if you need to get a different lamp.
 
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Old 08-03-17, 09:53 PM
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Norm, I'm only going on what I heard from the women in my life; my mother, mother-in-law, wife, sister and the like. If women today are opting for the cooler color bulbs it is music to my ears.
 
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Old 08-04-17, 02:54 AM
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I doubt you will have an issue with the slightly higher wattage lamp in your can. If it is too hot the thermal switch will turn the can on and off. Then you will know if you need to get a different lamp.
Thanks, that is what I was hoping to hear. Good to know there is a safety switch in the fixture.
 
 

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