Converted T8 fixtures to LED. Are they inductive or resistive loads now?


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Old 01-31-18, 11:00 AM
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Converted T8 fixtures to LED. Are they inductive or resistive loads now?

I'm asking this, for the purpose of figuring out which kind of digital timer to use on these lights, now.

It's for two fixtures of dual T8 4ft tubes, that I just converted to LED, in our bird room ( we have 5 rescued parrots ). So it's only about 70 watts total, but I'm not sure if these kinds of tubes have transformers inside them, or just switching power supplies, or perhaps just diodes and capacitors driving them.
 
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Old 01-31-18, 08:52 PM
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Only incandescent bulbs are resistive.
Everything else.... LED, fluorescent, CFL are all inductive.

I'd recommend getting a timer that requires a neutral wire and then make sure you have a neutral.

If you want a wall timer that works with all types of lights and is easy to install..... use the Intermatic ST-01. It has a battery that controls the timer. Doesn't require a neutral or special wiring.
Intermatic-15-Amp-Heavy-Duty-Astro-In-Wall-Digital-Timer-ST01
 
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Old 02-01-18, 09:56 AM
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I'm a former electronics R&D technician, and the reason I was asking about the LED is because it depends on how they're implemented, and I don't know the internal circuitry of these tubes. IF they have transformers in them, they would be inductive. But I really doubt they do, because transformers have iron cores and the weight would be obvious and add size. So I really think they are non-inductive.
 
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Old 02-01-18, 05:53 PM
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LED do not have transformers but the do have power suppiles/driver that change line A/C voltage to a lower DC voltage. It does this electronically so it is still an inductive load.

Other examples of inductive loads: Computers, TV's, motors, really anything that uses fancy electronics are not resistive loads and will have a power factor less then 1.
 
 

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