Help adding additional outlet

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Old 02-28-18, 01:37 PM
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Help adding additional outlet

hi-
i have an existing outlet that I am going to pigtail into so that I can add an additional outlet. There are two whites, two blacks, and a ground.

do I simply tie all the blacks together and all the whites together? Itís just garage outlet and I donít under stand why there are two blacks going in and two whites. Does that mean it is tied to a wal switch somewhere?

thx
 
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Old 02-28-18, 01:51 PM
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One cable is a feed-in and the other cable is a feed-out. The feed-in provides power to that particular outlet, and the feed-out continues on to the next outlet, etc. Each cable has a black (hot), white (neutral), and a bare copper (ground). If it is a regular outlet (meaning not a GFCI receptacle), then you are correct in that you simply tie all blacks together, all whites together, and all grounds together, with pigtails on each to feed the outlet. If it is a GFCI outlet you are tapping into, then you need to take note as to which is the "line in" and which is the "line out", to ensure proper GFCI protection.
 
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Old 02-28-18, 02:18 PM
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Thanks. Not GFCI. They had both of the blacks going into the quick clips in the back, same with the whites.

What is the easiest way to do this? I just want to make sure I understand it.

The two original blacks will pigtail with a short black that goes to the original outlet, plus a long black that goes to my new outlet. Same for the white and then pigtail one ground to the original and one long one to the new outlet?

sorry for my poor explanation. Thanks again.a
 
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Old 02-28-18, 03:32 PM
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You can pigtail All the blacks and all the whites and be sure to use the screw terminals instead of the back stab terminals,if itís in a garage it must be a GFCI receptacle.
Geo
 
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Old 02-28-18, 06:27 PM
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I'll have to go purchase some GFCI receptacles. The one I pulled out wasn't GFCI for some reason. I will post a picture tomorrow before I put it together to make sure I don't mess this up. thanks.
 
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Old 02-28-18, 06:38 PM
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You only need the first receptacle to be GFCI if the others are fed from the load side.

It is okay to use the side clips on GFCIs.
 
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Old 03-01-18, 08:48 AM
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Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
You only need the first receptacle to be GFCI if the others are fed from the load side.

It is okay to use the side clips on GFCIs.
Thank you Ray2047. I just got back from Lowes and was reading the directions which stated exactly what you just said. We have on GFCI which is a few feet from the panel and on the other side of the garage where I am working is the non GFCI receptacle.

I have the outlet removed and the two blacks separated and the two whites separated. There are two different Romex cables coming into that box.

I just want to make sure I understand everything.

1) So if I turned the breaker on and and test the black lines one should be live (LINE) and the other should be not have power (LOAD)?

2) For the GFCI it looks like you need to put the wire in the back and tighten the side screws instead of wrapping the wire around the screw on the side, or are both an option?

3) I attached a picture of my wiring diagram to make sure it is correct. In the picture of the outlet the white Romex is what I just installed. Both of the old grounds are pigtailed together already. I am just going to tie my new ground into that. Thank you!
 
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Old 03-01-18, 09:06 AM
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The diagram you showed is correct. However, as stated by ray2047, only ONE of the outlets on the circuit needs to be an actual GFCI outlet. All others "downstream" can be regular outlets (because the GFCI protects all of them). In other words, if you already have a GFCI outlet on that circuit protecting the existing outlet, you do not need to install another. Just use regular outlets from that point on. If the existing outlet was installed properly, it should already be GFCI protected. Just wanted to make that clear in case there was any misunderstanding.
 
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Old 03-01-18, 09:22 AM
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Originally Posted by mossman View Post
The diagram you showed is correct. However, as stated by ray2047, only ONE of the outlets on the circuit needs to be an actual GFCI outlet. All others "downstream" can be regular outlets (because the GFCI protects all of them). In other words, if you already have a GFCI outlet on that circuit protecting the existing outlet, you do not need to install another. Just use regular outlets from that point on. If the existing outlet was installed properly, it should already be GFCI protected. Just wanted to make that clear in case there was any misunderstanding.
I'm still waking up. I forgot that I didn't need another GFCI receptacle.

Since I already understand how to wire it will it be ok if I still use it? I am looking at a non GFCI outlet and it's not set up exactly the same on the back so it confuses me. It looks like if I go with the non GFCI I will need to splice in a small wire to pigtail everything together, while with the GFCI I won't have to because I can use the multiple attachments it offers in the back. thanks
 
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Old 03-01-18, 10:01 AM
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If you have two cables no need to pigtail. If three or more cables pigtail. Never use the backstabs on the non GFCI receptacle. They are unreliable.
 
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Old 03-01-18, 11:26 AM
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So is it OK then if I just use the GFCI in this case and use the backstabs on it since it will be a little cleaner since I have 3 wires I need to deal with?

why donít they just stop making the back stabs for non GFCI? I have never heard anyone say anything good about them. Thanks
 
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Old 03-01-18, 11:52 AM
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I've personally never had any issues with the back stabs. It's a PITA to get the wire back out, so to me they hold pretty well. Maybe others are using cheap outlets. IDK.
 
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Old 03-01-18, 01:01 PM
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GFCI are not backstabs. They are back or side wired held by screw pressure. Backstabs are unreliable because only a spring finger provides pressure and can loosen over time.
 
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Old 03-02-18, 11:59 AM
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I ended up going with the GFCI outlet instead of pig tailing stuff and using a standard receptacle. Works well. Thanks everyone
 
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