Exhaust fan/light replacing canned light directly above shower stall

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  #1  
Old 03-12-18, 11:37 PM
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Exhaust fan/light replacing canned light directly above shower stall

Hi,

We had an attic professional install the Panasonic 0510VSL1 exhaust fan/light combo above our shower enclosure.

It replaced a canned light in the same location. He did not connect it to the gfci outlet in our bathroom though, which is located above the vanity in the bathroom. I'm fairly inexperienced with this but he said the amperage on this fan is too low and it's fine installed simply replacing the light (which also was not on gfci and met code as of 2013 in the Chicago suburbs). The specs on the Panasonic unit, however, say " UL listed for tub/shower enclosure when GFCI protected".

I wanted to verify that this is indeed ok and this isn't a potentially unsafe situation. Thoughts or recommendations?

Thank you!

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Last edited by PJmax; 03-13-18 at 01:16 PM. Reason: enlarged/enhanced picture
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  #2  
Old 03-13-18, 05:12 AM
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If the mfg. specís calls for it to be GFCI protected then it must be on a GFCI protected circuit.
Geo
 
  #3  
Old 03-13-18, 07:29 AM
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That's what I feared 😀

Was he just being lazy?

More importantly, since I do not want to call him back out, can I simply replace the current on/off switch with a gfci controlled switch (this would be easier as I would not have to mess around in the attic)? Or do I absolutely need to connect the existing switch to the existing gfci outlet?

Thanks for your help!
 
  #4  
Old 03-13-18, 07:41 AM
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It only needs to be GFCI protected. A GFCI switch would do that..

Example: https://www.google.com/aclk?sa=L&ai=...9aACCDE&adurl=
 
  #5  
Old 03-14-18, 12:00 AM
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To answer your question you PMed me: The receptacle portion of the device has a line and load connection like any GFCI. The switch has two wires. Since you want the light GFCI protected one lead of the switch goes to the brass load screw on the GFCI receptacle.. The other switch lead goes to the hot wire to the light. Neutral from the light goes to the silver load screw on the GFCI.

Power in wires go to the line side of the GFCI receptacle as usual.

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I read the Q and A on the link you sent and a couple people said the gfci is completely independent of the switch. Question is, given my relatively novice status, can I will this up to turn this fan/light combo on and off while keeping it gfci protected relatively easily given its a standard light switch currently?
Yes, the switch is independant. You will still be using the same type of switch but you will get power from the load side of the built in GFCI receptacle. The diagram should make it easy. Post any follow up questions to the forum.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 03-14-18 at 12:23 AM.
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