How to wire multiple recessed cans together for one switch?

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Old 09-11-18, 05:15 AM
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How to wire multiple recessed cans together for one switch?

hey everyone. Iím looking for some guidance on how to wire 4 remodel cans together. Iíve wired other cans in our house but never multiple lights together.

Should I run the hot from the switch down the line of lights, one to the next to the next, and same for the neutral(from the box)? Then connect all their grounds in the same manner and ground them all in the box?

Thanks everyone for any invite you can give me.

 
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Old 09-11-18, 06:04 AM
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Are you using cable? I ask because you seem to be treating the neutral as separate. Re your comment:
and same for the neutral(from the box)?
What box? If cable (Romex) The power cable which includes the neutral goes to the switch box first.
 
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Old 09-11-18, 07:05 AM
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Yes Romex, Iím using 14/2. Sorry I hadnít drank my coffee yet when I had posted this. Is the best way to run the wires to the lights just running one light to the next down the line? Is there anything special that needs to be done at the last can?
 
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Old 09-11-18, 07:08 AM
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Iíve got one light in each corner of the room and I just want to make sure I wire them the most efficient way.

thanks for the quick response by the way Ray.
 
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Old 09-11-18, 07:33 AM
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Just run power to the switch then to the first light and then from there the second- and so forth. Nothing special at the last light.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 09-11-18 at 08:53 AM.
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Old 09-11-18, 07:56 AM
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Good deal! Thanks Ray, youíve been helping me for a few years now.
 
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Old 09-11-18, 02:45 PM
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Well Iíve got one more question for you.. I ran the lights through the ceiling and made my way to the light switch, Iím pretty sure this box is from 1920 when this house was built. Thereís no ground wire. Is there an easy way to ground them without tapping into an outlet? I hate mudding/drywalling! Thanks!
 
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Old 09-11-18, 03:17 PM
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How is the existing box wired? Conduit? BX/AC/MC cable? Knob and tube?
 
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Old 09-11-18, 03:32 PM
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I would say itís conduit wiring but Iím not sure of the cables they used. I just went and looked again but theyíre so dated I canít really tell.
 
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Old 09-11-18, 03:35 PM
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The switch box was solid steel.
 
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Old 09-11-18, 04:55 PM
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Another way to check is to look at your electrical panel. Many cases you can see the cables/conduits entering the panel and get a clue what wiring method was used.

If it is conduit it may be an acceptable grounding path.
 
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Old 09-12-18, 08:10 PM
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Oops, you were not supposed to add new stuff such as the can lights to the existing ungrounded circuit that served the switch and perhaps some older lights.

Flexible spiral metal conduit such as BX qualifies as grounded only if a wire or metal strip runs within the full length and outside any paper lining. This strip does not have to go into each outlet box and be wire nutted to other ground wires.

A single ground wire run separately is allowed. Run it from the point where the new cables with ground wires for the cans meet older ungrounded wiring to get power from. From there run it exactly, approximately, or vaguely following the power wires back to the panel with the breaker for the branch circuit. Should this separate ground wire first reach a fat ground wire (grounding electrode conductor) coming out of a panel or first reach a grounded outlet box, it may end there instead of going all the way to the panel.

You can daisy chain the cans together with a cable supplying power and one cable continuing to the next light. Usually you cannot have two continuing cables from one can going in different directions to additional lights because the box in the can light assembly where you make the connections is too small for that.
 
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