Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Electrical, AC & DC. Electronic Equipment and Computers > Lighting, Light Fixtures, Ceiling and Exhaust Fans
Reload this Page >

Taymac in use + 12 Gauge GFCI cord + 16 Gauge Extension cord + Christmas Lights

Taymac in use + 12 Gauge GFCI cord + 16 Gauge Extension cord + Christmas Lights


  #1  
Old 12-29-18, 10:14 PM
L
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 9
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Taymac in use + 12 Gauge GFCI cord + 16 Gauge Extension cord + Christmas Lights

Name:  gfci cord.jpg
Views: 392
Size:  103.9 KB

Dear Guys, I was embarking on a project to change my GFCI for an outdoor receptacle when i stumbled upon a product online and that seemed to me a simpler solution, if it wld work

Product: 3 foot GFCI cord 12 gauge.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B073ZMLZGW/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_4?smid=A26OASPQYU1JXQ&psc=1

What I intend to do is plug this into a weatherproof "in use box" (taymac). I believe this cord itself is water / weather resistant including the reset switches etc and there after plug my 50 feet extension cord into this cord and reach my christmas light string at the other end.

the advantage i get opportunity to plug single or multiple extension cords into this one cord (if need be) as it has 3 outlets and all get gfci protected during rain etc.

Now the only question i have is: Is it ok to plug a 16 gauge or a 14 gauge extension cord to this 12 gauge GFCI cord cause i cant find a 14 or a 16 gauge GFCI cord anywhere.

so basically: The receptacle (NON GFCI) in a Taymac box + The 12 gauge 3 feet GFCI plugged into the receptacle and then a 14 or 16 gauge cord about 50 feet plugged into the GFCI cord and there after the light strings. Would this work?
 
  #2  
Old 12-30-18, 01:52 PM
L
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 9
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Dear Friends pls do help out...
 
  #3  
Old 12-30-18, 02:37 PM
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: United States
Posts: 1,039
Received 78 Upvotes on 73 Posts
That cord will provide GFCI protection for what ever is plugged into it, however the right way is to provide a GFCI receptacle at the point of use. You can replace that outlet (In your other thread). I personally don't like GFCI devices outside in the weather elements. So I usually protect it before the wire or cable goes outside
 
  #4  
Old 12-30-18, 06:09 PM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 10,949
Received 716 Upvotes on 637 Posts
I tend to agree with "CB".

What I question is the change in wire gauge. Your weakest point is the 14 or 16 gauge wire. I wonder if the GFCI cord will trip if the 16 gauge wire were to get hot due to over draw of amperage?

In your case I doubt you will have a problem.
 
  #5  
Old 12-30-18, 06:18 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 8,031
Received 513 Upvotes on 418 Posts
I wonder if the GFCI cord will trip if the 16 gauge wire were to get hot due to over draw of amperage?
The GFCI would not trip for those conditions. GFCI trips by imbalance of current between hot an neutral. The wire could be glowing red but if the current on the hot and neutral are equal the GFCI will not trip.
 
  #6  
Old 12-30-18, 06:38 PM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 10,949
Received 716 Upvotes on 637 Posts
Good to to know. Thanks joed!

PS... Wait. This begs the question...Say I have CFCI outlet as coded request. I use a power tool say with a 16 gauge 35 foot extension cord. I over work the power tool (saw, hedges clipper, lawnmower, whatever...) and the cord begins to get hot. I'm not protected? So what is my protection using a GFCI other than possible wet conditions?
 
  #7  
Old 12-30-18, 10:02 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 8,031
Received 513 Upvotes on 418 Posts
Your protection with GFCI is from shock. If a wire become exposed or the device shorted inside to make the metal frame hot the GFCI would trip when you touched it instead of shocking you.
 
  #8  
Old 12-31-18, 07:14 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 27,527
Received 2,120 Upvotes on 1,898 Posts
A GFCI and circuit breaker are two different monsters. A circuit breaker protects the wiring in the walls from overload and fire. It senses too much current being drawn and trips (turns off). If you stick your tongue on a bare wire protected by a circuit breaker it provides NO protection against shock. The breaker will continue cooking your tongue all the way up to the amp capacity of the breaker with some buffer or delay. A circuit breaker will trip at different times depending on how much current is being drawn. A slight overload may take 30 seconds to trip the breaker. This allows high starting current like when a fridge turns on to not trip the breaker. But if there is a massive overload like a dead short then the breaker will trip almost instantly.

As Joed mentioned a GFCI measures an imbalance between the hot and neutral. Sort of like an electronic see-saw. As long as the hot and neutral are in balance the see-saw stays balanced and current flows. It doesn't care how much current flows as long as it's in balance. If the current goes somewhere else like to ground or to a person that knocks the current between hot and neutral out of balance causing the GFCI to trip. They are extremely sensitive and trip without delay.
 
  #9  
Old 12-31-18, 01:28 PM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 4,507
Upvotes: 0
Received 275 Upvotes on 251 Posts
You can plug a 16 gauge extension cord into a 12 gauge extension cord or vice versa and i t will work the same way. In both cases you need to use manual discipline not to overload the thinner cord.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: