Size & amount of recessed lights

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Old 03-13-19, 08:41 PM
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Size & amount of recessed lights

Hi, I am going to install new recessed lighting in the dropped ceiling. The kitchen is around 15 x 15 ft. How many recessed lights & how much do I have to pay? I have heard of different size says 4 inch, 6 inch and even 8 inch. Why are there so many choices? Many thx.
 

Last edited by Pat-Caldwell; 03-13-19 at 11:29 PM.
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Old 03-13-19, 09:12 PM
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What's the ceiling height? What uses will the room see?
 
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Old 03-13-19, 10:07 PM
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The ceiling height is around 15 ft. Nothing special at all.
 

Last edited by Pat-Caldwell; 03-13-19 at 11:30 PM.
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Old 03-13-19, 11:44 PM
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Since kitchen is one of the most active places in your home where everybody in the family likes to spend some time, it should have enough ambient light. Having said that, we know the kitchen is somewhat a complicated space for which lighting needs to be planned properly. Because their placement can be planned, recessed lighting is perfect for the kitchen. But still, many other things need to be considered before you are able to light up your kitchen properly. Mind you, the kitchen needs more light in certain spaces and areas. They need to be properly lit.

Spacing Rules

As for the spacing, we can keep around 20 to 24 inches to there is enough space. The space between each recessed light row can be 2 to 4 ft, so they are not too crowded. Hence, your kitchen may need approximately 3 to 4 rows of recessed lighting. Besides, it should be noticed that we should leave some gap from the wall; otherwise, part of the light beam will be lost due to wall reflection. In short, in order to light up the 15x15 ft kitchen, we will need around 12 to 15 lights. I prefer 4 inch because they are relatively small and not so bright.

This placement of recessed lights will provide an effective lighting solution to your kitchen. However, more needs to be done to illuminate certain areas of the kitchen that needs more focused lighting. There are certain awkward spaces in the kitchen which are hard to illuminate with ordinary recessed lights. You can install a couple of task lights with their focus directed to those hard-to-illuminate areas. Recessed lights are the best options for modern kitchens, which are not only getting more spacious and bigger these days but also require special light designing to illuminate it properly.
 
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Old 03-14-19, 03:03 AM
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What you can install will depend a lot on how it is framed and id there are any obstructions between the joists/trusses. (Plumbing pipes, HVAC runs, etc)

12-15 sounds to be too much even with 4" cans. I tend to install more 6" cans for general lighting and 4" for accent lighting. They are less expensive for housings and trims, and there are more options for trims and lamps. Lights can always be dimmed down but you can't make them brighter than their max.

Note: 8" are only used in commercial settings.

You need to contact some local electrical contractors to get prices in your area. Of course, it will be much less expensive if you DIY it.
 
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Old 03-14-19, 10:37 AM
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One thing I like to do is make sure there's a can over each spot where someone will potentially be working in the room.
 
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Old 03-15-19, 06:48 PM
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I would look at the LED disk lights that look like a recessed.

I agree, 4" lights are for accent, not general lighting. The spacing will depend on the mounting height, bulb used, trim used, height of the area you are trying to light, beam spread etc.
 
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Old 03-16-19, 06:21 AM
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Back in the old days of incandescent lamps, physically larger fixtures permitted larger wattage lamps for heat dissipation purposes. Today, LED delivers practically all of the light (quantity) that most people would ever want using the smallest (4 inch) fixture. You still need multiple fixtures to achieve the spread of light you want.

Usually for even lighting using can lights the distance of the outermost fixture to the wall is half the distance between fixtures.
 
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