Ceiling fan and lights on two switches with remote

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  #1  
Old 01-24-20, 10:53 AM
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Ceiling fan and lights on two switches with remote

Hey all, I search and found multiple posts talking a bit about this, so this can be short, I just want to verify that I am doing this right. I recently added recessed lights to my bedroom, and replaced the center fixture box with one rated for a ceiling fan. I am now wiring up the ceiling fan. After reading some of the posts, it looks like if I want to use the remote and still be able to control the lights and fan on separate switches, then I have to choose to have one of the switches act as master power to the receiver for the remote.

Anyway, the power is coming into the switch box, there was an existing 14-2 wire going to the light fixture, and I added another 14-2 wire to the switch box to add the switch for the ceiling fan. In all the diagrams I'm looking at, it looks like I could have accomplished the same thing with just a 14-3 wire, but I suppose I can just use one of the wires from the extra 14-2 wire I ran and cap off the white and ground for that one if I want. Anyway, the way I have the switches wired right now, each 14-2 wire is connected fully to each switch, going up to the ceiling, and here is the way I would plan on wiring it if I didn't want to rewire the switches. My understanding is that in this configuration, the fan switch would act as a master power to the receiver, allowing me to turn the lights on and off with the light switch, and as long as the fan switch was on, I could control the fan with the remote. Is this correct? Here is that configuration:


Now if I wanted to reduce the number of wires I had to bind together (5 white wires sucks to put in a wire nut, especially with the cheap wire from the fan and the remote mixed in), I could cut off the white and ground wires from the fan switch, and just use the black wire in the fan wire as the "red" wire, as if I were running a 14-3 wire, right? I would have to rewire the switches, and here is how I imagine that would work. Is this correct?



Another interesting note about this fan, (Hunter Parmer 46 in) it included two long lag type wood screws, and the instructions said to screw the mounting plate directly to the wood structure of the house. it didn't even mention the screws for the ceiling fan box that I installed. Well, the metal fan box I bought is screwed directly to one of the roof joists, and since I wanted to center the fan on the box, I could only screw one of those wood screws into the ceiling joist, as the other side has only drywall. I trust that the ceiling fan box itself is enough to hold the weight of the ceiling fan since it is screwed directly to the wood structure, so are those wood screws just to help fasten the thing tighter to the roof to prevent wobbling and stabilize it more? Or are they really needed to hold the weight of the fan?
 
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Old 01-24-20, 11:57 AM
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Two issues I see.
1. Connect all the ground together even the one from the new cable.
2. I don't know how the remote will react to being reverse powered when you turn on the light switch. I would choose one option for the light. Either use the switch or the remote.
 
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Old 01-24-20, 01:23 PM
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Two issues I see.
1. Connect all the ground together even the one from the new cable.
2. I don't know how the remote will react to being reverse powered when you turn on the light switch. I would choose one option for the light. Either use the switch or the remote.
Ah, duh, didn't think about the fact I was reversing power through the remote there. I suppose there is no option really to use the remote to turn the light on and off as well is there? Sounds like that would turn it into somewhat of a three way switch, which I'm sure the remote is not set up to do. I guess if I wanted to be able to run both the fan and light with the remote, then I would basically just have one master switch that turns the whole thing on, then I would have to use the remote for lights and fan.

So if I just cap off the blue cable from the receiver, then basically the lights will be controlled only by the wall switch, and as long as the fan switch was on, we could control the fan with the remote. Like this?
 
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Old 01-24-20, 02:19 PM
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Or you could control the fan light with the remote and the recessed lights with the switch.
 
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Old 01-24-20, 02:23 PM
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Or you could control the fan light with the remote and the recessed lights with the switch.
Oh that's not a bad idea, I hadn't thought of that. We could actually do without the fan light 90% of the time, because the recessed lights are so bright as they are. Thanks a bunch, you've been very helpful, you caught the flaws in my design, and I have a way forward now.
 

Last edited by paqman; 01-24-20 at 02:42 PM.
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Old 01-26-20, 07:36 AM
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I got it wired up friday night, as we discussed, I have the light switch controlling only the recessed lights, and the remote controls the fan and the fan lights, which are both supplied power by the fan switch on the wall. It's all working great. Thanks for the help!
 
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