BR30 bulb stuck in recessed can


  #1  
Old 01-30-20, 08:57 PM
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BR30 bulb stuck in recessed can

Trying to change out 12 recessed lights to new LED bulbs.

Problem is out of 12 lights, two of them won't back out all the way. I tried turning it counterclockwise to loosen but both turned about one revolution then it got stuck, won't turn anymore. Won't turn clockwise or counterclockwise.

<img src="https://i.postimg.cc/hPq7ZKMK/IMG-20200130-201423.jpg" width="576" height="432"/>

I don't want to put excessive force to turn it for fear I would break the bulb and shatter the glass.

This is what the trim and can looks like, the trim has a built-in inverted cone, so removing the trim will not give me more room to grab the bulb.


<img src="https://i.postimg.cc/xjmzPXvs/IMG-20200130-201442.jpg" width="576" height="432"/>

Any idea what else to try? Tape the entire bottom of the bulb with duct tape then try turning again?
 
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Old 01-30-20, 09:08 PM
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Maybe one of those rubber pads used to open a stuck jar lid.

Make sure when replacing the bulbs you put a little lubrication on the aluminum shell.
 
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Old 01-30-20, 09:19 PM
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It's a tight fit. I can't fit anything between the bulb and the edge of the trim. That;s why the only way to turn it is to push up and turn on the front surface of the bulb I can't touch anything on the side.
 
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Old 01-31-20, 06:09 AM
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I turn off the circuit/power. Put on safety goggles because there is a chance the bulb will shatter and put on heavy leather gloves and keep your mouth closed. I first try the leather gloves on the bulb. If you still can't grip it hard enough then I use a piece of cushy, non-slip shelf liner or a rubber pad used to remove tough lids on jars. Turn hard and keep your mouth closed, yes it's important. If this is the only way I can think of to remove the bulb I just give it he11 until either the bulb comes free, the bulb breaks or the socket in the fixture comes loose. The outcome is split about 1/3 for each option. If I feel the socket coming loose in the fixture I stop. Get a hammer and break the bulb and remove it the hard way by using a pair of needle nose pliers to pry and pull the base of the bulb out of the socket (which is why it's important to have the power turned off).
 
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Old 01-31-20, 06:10 AM
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Most like;y the bulb base and the socket have galled (dissimilar metals ). Worst case scenario, turn off electric circuit, use a plastic bag and gloves. Cover bulb and break it. Use a potato and jam it into the broken bulb and screw it out. Be prepared to maybe use a needle nose pliers to dig out the bulb base.
 
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Old 01-31-20, 06:33 AM
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You could try tape.
Use tape that is close to the diameter of the bulb,
Use a piece longer that the diameter
Then fold each end back on itself so the middle (bulb diameter) is where the glue is.
Then try getting it out.

Also a suction cup on the face of the bulb may work.

Hard to tell the clearance but perhaps a car oil filter removal tool would work.
The type that has fingers that tighten onto the filter as you unscrew it.

Turn the bulb in both directions a little.
When it starts to bind go in the opposite direction until it finally comes out.

Wear gloves and safety glasses,

 
  #7  
Old 01-31-20, 09:49 PM
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I was finally able to remove the two bulbs. Ten of the twelve bulbs came out easy, the last two didn't. One bulb broke off, the other came loose as I twisted with all my strength.

I figured out what happened. These are very old recessed lights, and the socket is mounted on a piece of thin circular metal that slides up and down secured to the can with a wing nut. For some reason the wing nuts were loose so when I pushed up the bulb got pushed back along with the socket. When I tried to turn to loosen it got stuck, and the more I turned the more the bulb got pushed back further.

This is the trim I have. As you can see, the bulb hugs to it's shape closely with barely 1/4" of space around.


<img src="https://i.postimg.cc/sgqfWZpc/IMG-20200131-190118.jpg" width="432" height="576"/>

The can was made by CREST LIGHTING of Cleveland, Ohio. I don't think they exist anymore.

<img src="https://i.postimg.cc/1zFmr5BZ/IMG-20200131-190152.jpg" width="432" height="576"/>
 
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Old 01-31-20, 10:29 PM
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Make sure when replacing the bulbs you put a little lubrication on the aluminum shell.
I have done this for years. A thin coat of Vas - er, petroleum jelly - really helps down the line when removing a bulb. Oddly, none of the pro electricians I have mentioned this to had ever heard of that.
 
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Old 02-01-20, 03:01 AM
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I use a very thin coat of anti oxidant grease,
 
  #10  
Old 02-01-20, 05:56 AM
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Use the electrical grease that they use on cars. Available at all auto stores. It's meant for electrical conductivity.
 
 

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