Switching GU24 bulbs from CFL to LED?


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Old 02-28-20, 04:10 AM
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Switching GU24 bulbs from CFL to LED?

I have the attached light fixture over my basement bathroom mirror that uses GU24 style bulbs. It’s difficult to find replacement bulbs locally, and I’m not in a position to swap it out for a different fixture right now.

It had the spiral light bulbs when we moved in which worked great, but now two of the three bulbs have burnt out and are ready to be replaced.

These are available from Lowes, but they’re LED and not the same spiral style (they have the appropriate base, and the lumens match up - though the new ones are apparently 10w while the old ones say 13w)

(picture in replies of fixture)
https://www.lowes.com/pd/GE-Classic-...ack/1000444619


Would these bulbs work in that fixture since they have those glass covers over the bulbs - or should I keep looking until I find appropriate spiral ones?

 
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Old 02-28-20, 04:14 AM
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Here’s the fixture. There’s no bottoms to the glass covering the bulbs, but it is in a frequently used bathroom with a shower in it
 
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Old 02-28-20, 04:53 AM
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If the base is the same the LED's will fit. However, be aware that since the bulbs fit base side up, the electronics or ballast in the bulb will be subjected to more heat than necessary. This in itself is not a problem, but will reduce the life expectancy to a degree.
 
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Old 02-28-20, 05:50 AM
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By spiral I assume you mean fluorescent bulbs.
LED's are more efficient than fluorescent so a lower wattage puts out the same light (lumens).

The bulbs you show will give off a more yellow light at 2700 K.
Looks like they also have the same bulb but at 5000 K which will be a whiter light.
Google "bulb color chert" to get info on how the K value changes the light color.
 
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Old 02-28-20, 06:30 AM
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Manden makes a good point.

Don't pay attention to wattage. That's what you pay the power company, not the brightness of the bulb. Lumens is the brightness. The higher the number the brighter the light. And Kelvin temp is the color. It can range from 2700K to typically 5000K. For any given color or Kelvin temp the brightness will be the same. Many people think the warm white (2700 K) is dimmer than the same bulb with a daylight (5000K). The brightness is the same. The difference is the contrast that we see. I tell customers to typically use a daylight in and around a work area, kitchen food preparation, work bench, sewing machine room, garage, bath area. Use the warm or subdued lighting in the dinning area, bedroom, living room, hallways and night lites. Or if you're older like myself, you may want to go more for the daylight color as our eyes begin to deteriorate.

Regardless of the bulb style, be it incandescent, CFL or LED, the only thing important is the lumens and color.

Note: color party bulbs are not rated in lumens because the measuring of a particular wave length is not comparable or consistent to white light. In that case wattage will be your guide to brightness.
 
 

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