Outlet code requirements


  #1  
Old 07-21-20, 08:41 AM
M
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Outlet code requirements

I am installing a new circuit to add additional outlets in a cabin that when it was previously remodeled back in the 1970ís did not comply with 6 foot rule when installing new outlets. I donít know what the code was back then for outlets I just want to add the circuit because every time I run my saw In the attached garage the 20 A breaker trips if I have the coffee pot on. Do I have to have all the outlets on new circuit and old circuits comply with the 6 foot rule? The new circuit is in the cabin, and not the attached garage. Aside from the bathroom and 2 bedrooms the rest of the cabin is pretty much open. There are no walls partitioning like a separate kitchen, living room, dining room, makes it kind of hard to apply code requirements.
 
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Old 07-21-20, 09:59 AM
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Typically, when you upgrade one area of your house, it does not trigger other areas to be upgraded to current code. For example, if you gut and redo your kitchen, you're required to bring the kitchen electrical up to current code, but not the adjoining living room.

In your case, adding a new circuit to the garage, you'll need to make sure that garage receptacle is GFI protected (and possibly AFCI depending on your code cycle), but you don't need to upgrade anything else in the house. You can either leave the existing receptacle in the garage and know to not use it, or you can remove the receptacle and cover the box with a blank plate.

Also, it sounds like you might be misunderstanding the 6' rule, which many people call the 6'/12' rule. If you follow the wall around the room, you need a receptacle within 6' of any door or opening, and no more than 12' between receptacles. If you have a big open room, you still just need receptacles around the perimeter, there's no requirement for floor outlets or anything. Of course, this is just minimum code, many people install more receptacles than needed.
 
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Old 07-21-20, 10:57 AM
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Would changing out cabinets, counter, and paneling in the what I would call the kitchen area require me to bring everything in that area up to code?
 
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Old 07-21-20, 12:24 PM
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It should not if you are not touching the electrical. As soon as you make one change to the electrical new code applies.
If changing the panelling means the walls are open I would do it even if not required.
 
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Old 07-24-20, 10:45 AM
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changing out cabinets, counter, and paneling
It's gray area and ultimately up to your AJH (building inspector). In my area, removing wall coverings (drywall/plaster) triggers upgrading everything in that room (electrical, smoke alarms, ductwork, etc). So many renovators just slap drywall over the cracking and failing plaster, since that doesn't require upgrades.

I agree with Joed, regardless of the specific requirements, if the walls are open, it's a good opportunity to run a few more circuits and receptacles and bring everything up to this decade's electrical requirements.
 
  #6  
Old 07-24-20, 12:55 PM
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Hi, if you are taking out a permit be specific about which area is to be inspected.
Geo
 
 

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