Recessed lighting can type.


  #1  
Old 07-23-20, 08:52 PM
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Recessed lighting can type.

Hello all, hope all is well with you all.

I am planning on installing my first recessed lighting.

Can someone please tell me the difference between the cans in the pictures below? When do i use the can with the 2 long parallel arms sticking out ( puc 2 ) and when do i use the one with no arms ( pic 1 ).

Thanks for the reply.
<img src="https://cimg1.ibsrv.net/gimg/www.doityourselft.com-vbulletin/498x344/hh1_89666afebbb1f13e889f75e37c82ab063ad777cd.jpg" width="498" height="344"/>

<img src="https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/www.doityourselft.com-vbulletin/502x247/hh2_6ba4a4c25f4ef190ca45cdf37e94320de37576db.jpg" width="502" height="247"/>
 

Last edited by PJmax; 07-23-20 at 10:05 PM. Reason: resized pics
  #2  
Old 07-23-20, 10:11 PM
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The top fixture is called an old work type because the ceiling is in place. You cut the proper round hole in the ceiling. You fold the four spring clips inside the can. You put the junction box end in first and then the can itself. Then you push those clips out one at a time so that when they snap out they are on top of the sheetrock.

The bottom fixture is called a new work fixture because it's installed by sliding the bars out and nailing them to the ceiling joists before the sheetrock is installed. This could be installed as old work if you had attic access.

An important thing to keep in mind..... if you are installing a fixture where there is or will be insulation you need to use a fixture that is rated to be mounted in insulation. Both the fixtures in your pictures cannot be used with insulation.
 
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Old 07-23-20, 10:16 PM
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Thanks for the reply. So how far from the insulation do they need to be?
Here is the link for the old style box that i want to install. Also, please see the i insulation related info highlighted in red.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Globe-Electric-4-in-White-Dimmable-Recessed-New-Construction-and-Remodel-Lighting-Kit-10-Pack-90540/203976637

<img src="https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/www.doityourselft.com-vbulletin/1000x2000/screenshot_20200724_012003_chrome_58491db5c0d91f94a0d2e509be3c9586537d8e15.jpg" width="1000" height="2000"/>


 
  #4  
Old 07-24-20, 06:18 AM
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Hi, they are fine for your application, if you are doing old work make sure you know whats above, I like to make a small patchable cut to probe around before cutting the hole for the fixtures.
Geo
 
  #5  
Old 07-24-20, 10:30 AM
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If there's insulation in the ceiling that you're installing, it would be best to use an IC rated can/fixture. IC = Insulation Contact. They are also better sealed for less air infiltration.

They do make insulation boxes that keep the insulation the prescribed 6" away: https://www.homedepot.com/p/BAZZ-Vap...P101/203562722
In certain cases, it's a decent solution, but in general, I'd recommend IC fixtures.

All my new installations, I use wafer LEDs instead of the can style fixtures. I find they are easier to install and less expensive. Here's one example, but there are different trim options, different brands, etc. Again, make sure it's IC rated.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Lithonia...4T2W/306570225
 
  #6  
Old 07-24-20, 08:59 PM
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IC rated when used with an LED bulb.
What if the LED bulb is replaced with an incandescent bulb in the future ?
 
 

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