Replacing fluorescent with 4 wafer lights but no ground


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Old 09-27-20, 10:32 AM
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Replacing fluorescent with 4 wafer lights but no ground

Need advice. I'm replacing a fluorescent light with 4 wafers. I've drilled the holes and pulled the 12/2 wire. I took the fluorescent down and there is no ground. The wire is in metal conduit and I read on another thread that I can attach the 12/2 ground to the metal conduit. I assume it's grounded but I'm in a condo with no access to the attic. I can only see from the holes I've made. How do you attach a ground to the conduit if that is the solution. The date on the fuse box is 1969. -- Thanks
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Old 09-27-20, 10:49 AM
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Conduit makes that a tough job. You need a box at the end of the conduit to convert from individual wires to nm-b cable. The easiest way to accomplish what you need to do is to leave that box just as it is. Take a knockout out and connect your NM-b directly into the box. There is a small hole that will take a ground screw and that's where the ground gets connected. You can use a canopy blank over that box as it will need to remain accessible.

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Old 09-27-20, 12:18 PM
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Thanks Paul. I was able to detach it from the ceiling supports and pull the new wire. I'll run up to Home Depot for a cover plate. Not sure if I have a screw with me for the ground wire, but I'll get one if I don't. I'm doing this at my son's condo several hundred miles from my home. I really appreciate your quick reply.

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Old 10-14-20, 04:51 AM
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Before you do this work you need to verify whether (quite often) electrical work in a multifamily building (beyond installing a nicer light fixture in the same place or replacing a broken receptacle) has to be done by a licensed professional.S/he would determine whether the existing conduit is a good and sufficient equipment grounding conductor and if it is not, run a separate EGC after the fact..
 
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Old 10-14-20, 07:52 PM
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It's a little late now Allan...... it looks like all the holes are cut and wire is run.
That EMT is considered an acceptable ground.
 
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Old 10-15-20, 07:32 AM
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Thanks for all the replies. They were very helpful.

Sam
 
 

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