T8 fluorescent light - problem w/ tubes? ballast? LED retrofit?

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Old 11-02-20, 09:19 AM
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T8 fluorescent light - problem w/ tubes? ballast? LED retrofit?

We bought a kitchen light from hd back in 2007? Lithonia is the brand?

4 t8 bulbs 4’ long.

I have in my notes that in 2014 the ballast failed and mfr sent replacement for free / I put it in. (not sure what the problem was that they replaced it)

Now 2020, 2 bulbs on 1 side are not lighting / darker at 1 end than the other 2 on other side that do light up.

Any thoughts?? the 2 bulbs that are out need to be replaced? Replace all 4? Or ballast is bad? Is there a retrofit led solution? Either as bulbs or as ‘sheet(s)’? Is it usual that 2 on 1 side get darker sooner than the other 2? (all 4 would come on with 1 switch). The ballast has the rights fed with same color and lefts fed with same color.

I never understood fluorescents and when bulbs or ballast need replacement ; ). Feel free to offer advice / tips.

And my perception is that fluorescents are supposed to last. Worked at retailer w 6’? 8’? Florescents in store. Never needed replacement. On for 10+ hours a day. That was 30 years ago. Don’t make them like they used to?

Or I think I heard it’s not running hours that kill fluorescent? It’s number of starts?

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Old 11-02-20, 09:28 AM
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I wouldn't bother debugging and would just convert to LED's.
 
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Old 11-02-20, 09:44 AM
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thanks! My wife likes the fixture. Are there LED tubes or 'mats' that I'd mount in there and keep the wood / plastic cover? Or toss all of it and start new?
 
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Old 11-02-20, 10:01 AM
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I'm seeing lots of LED tubes on the web. Home Depot doesn't seem to sell them? Any recommendation on where to get LED tubes?
 
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Old 11-02-20, 10:17 AM
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Home Depot sells a ton of them.
T-8 LED's available in cool white, warm white and daylight.

They come in two styles......
1) direct replacement.
2) remove the ballast(s).
The remove the ballast type takes a little easy installation work but is the most effective and energy savings way to go.
 
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Old 11-02-20, 12:17 PM
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You can keep your old fixture. Switching to LED is only slightly more work than changing the bulbs. I like to get the line (AC) powered bulbs. These allow you do disconnect the old ballast and you rewire the fixture according to the bulb's instructions. Basically you rewire the fixture totally bypassing (you can remove it if you want) the ballast and feed 120 VAC directly to the bulbs. All the electronics and everything is contained within the bulbs.

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Old 11-03-20, 08:34 PM
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THANKS!!! I swapped lights and problem (not lighting) followed the lights. Started noticing a little coiled piece of metal inside rolling around. That's the starter filament? I guess thats a sign the bulbs are shot.

these F28T8/DW bulbs supposedly are 2700 lumens? and there's 4 of them. I bought 2 packs of Toggled LED bypass LED lights (2 in a box). the box says 2000 lumens each tube. Cute design - triangular tubes!? Comes with the unshunted tombstones, etc.

WAY brighter than before. (2000 pointing down vs. 2700 all around). I wound up pointing the LED tubes up so they light the white metal and bounce down. They are good now : ) Sound OK to point the triangle tubes up rather than down?

The LEDs say they are dimmable. Anyone know if a toggle wall switch that has a 'hidden' dimmer control? Set it at the right brightness and put regular faceplace on... never want to change brightness after that (OK, maybe years later? LED brightness does taper?).



 
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Old 11-03-20, 08:42 PM
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that's over the kitchen prep area. now I want to do this over the kitchen table! have 6 2' forescent tubes in 3 fixtures wedged into a framed out area over the kitchen table!

But like I saw with the 4'ers in the other part of the kitchen. The florescents are around 2700 lumens or more each. the same number of LED tubes, each supposedly 2000 lumens will likely be wayyyy too bright. Any correlation / math for 'converting' florescent Lumens to LED lumens (I know lumens are lumens... I mean the fact that 2700 lumens from a florescent goes up and down, and the up gets reflected by the white of the fixture. but even then, 2000 from the LEDs pointing down was too bright. We had to install the LEDs with the LEDs pointing up to bounce of the white of the housing as a poor man's dimmer.

4 LEDs rather than 6 over the dinner table?!
 
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Old 11-04-20, 06:12 AM
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Oddly compact fluorescent's seemed to overstate their brightness while LED's understate. In my office when I replaced fluorescent bulbs with LED's I cut the number of bulbs in half. The fixtures each held four 48" tubes but not have two LED's.
 
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Old 11-05-20, 05:47 AM
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Hi, the 2700 is the lamp color, the 2000 lumens is the brightness. 2700 being a warmer color, 3500 being a bit whiter and brighter 4000, 5000 etc., 2700 is probably a good choice for the kitchen area.
Geo 🇺🇸
 
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Old 11-05-20, 08:59 AM
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Yeah, I know about the color temp stuff... (Anyone have a comment on my thinking - higher temp / bluer light is perceived as brighter for the same lumens? ie daylight at x lumens seems brighter than cool white at x lumens?

But the florescents are about 2700 - 3000 lumens.

THe bulbs we were replacing are discontinued / can't find the page I found previously about that bulb lumens but this one is similar type / lenght
https://www.1000bulbs.com/product/99642/GE-72866.html

that says 2650 lumens.

The LEDs are supposedly 2000. But as pilot dane says - they are understated???

Or is it the fact that the old florescents radiate the light up and down / 360 degrees and they likely come up with 2700 based on all the light coming out of the tube, the half going up gets bounced off the fixture before coming down to people. some of the light gets absorbed by the whilte fixture / doesn't get bounced.... so you on the ground don't get all 2700 lumens. but I'd think you'd still get the same / close to 2000 with white.

Vs. the LEDs that point downward for the mostpart / you get more of the 2000 lumens.

I'm replacing 6 - 2' bulbs soon with 4 LEDs and see how that works.
 
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Old 11-05-20, 09:39 AM
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I think you are running into a lack of standardization. There is no one right way to measure the light output of a bulb. Even measuring lumens is open to interpretation for example what wavelengths do you count in brightness. At some point you just have to make your best guess and try them.
 
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Old 11-05-20, 10:58 AM
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The LEDs say they are dimmable. Anyone know if a toggle wall switch that has a 'hidden' dimmer control?
It's not quite hidden, but I use a Lutron Diva dimmer in cases like this. It has the dimmer, but it's a side slider and doesn't affect the ease of turning on/off the lights.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Lutron-D...P-GR/203783643
<img src="https://images.homedepot-static.com/productImages/067d0bcb-9183-4027-801d-7d492ccf3485/svn/gray-lutron-dimmers-dvcl-153p-gr-64_145.jpg" width="145" height="145"/>
 
 

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