Wiring exhaust fan

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  #1  
Old 11-30-20, 01:06 AM
J
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Wiring exhaust fan

Hey,

Could someone run me through wiring up a bathroom exhaust fan. I have recently noticed mold because the room always gets damp from showering.

The fan doesn't have a light or anything. I want to use an existing outlet to run the power from, but of course I will also need to add a switch for the fan to turn it on and off since the outlet has constant power. As far as electrical goes, I change outlets and switches when needed, but not sure how to wire this up.

Thanks for any help getting this wired up.
 
  #2  
Old 11-30-20, 06:09 AM
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The most difficult part will be pulling the wire from your switch up into the ceiling. Do you have access in the attic to the area above the ceiling?
 
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Old 11-30-20, 10:37 AM
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It won't be easy but I should be able to pull the wire through. Just need help figuring out how to wire it.
 
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Old 11-30-20, 11:03 AM
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You also need to figure out how you are going to vent it to outdoors.
 
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Old 11-30-20, 11:10 AM
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I've got placement and everything figured out as far as venting. Thanks
 
  #6  
Old 11-30-20, 11:49 AM
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You're going to run a 12/2 NM-B cable from the existing receptacle to a new 1-gang old work box for the switch.
From the switch box, another similarly cable up to the fan.

At the receptacle, you'll connect the ground to the existing grounds, neutral to the existing neutrals, and hot to the existing hots.
At the switch, the grounds get connected and wire-nutted together, the white neutrals the same. The hot from the receptacle and the one to the fan both get connected to the switch. Lastly, a ground wire from the switch goes to the same bundle of grounds in the box.
At the fan, the cable needs a cable clamp, then simply wire nut black to black, white to white, and ground gets likely connected under a screw.

If the fan is over the shower area, it needs to be GFI protected, and needs to be connected to the receptacle differently.

Does that help?
 
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Old 11-30-20, 12:32 PM
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Sure does. I appreciate the explanation. Take care.
 
  #8  
Old 11-30-20, 02:42 PM
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The existing receptacle in the bathroom should already have GFI protection (receptacle or breaker at panel). If not then replace the receptacle with a GFI receptacle.

If you need GFI protection for the fan (over a shower) you can connect the power for it to the LOAD side of the GFI receptacle.
 
 

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