Open end power cord for LED recessed lights


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Old 12-19-20, 09:13 AM
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Open end power cord for LED recessed lights

Hi guys,

I just purchased two 5" recessed LED lights that I want to connect using a simple power cord with an inline switch.

As a power cord, I had in mind this one or likely an 18/3 is fine too, however, it seems to be difficult to find something with a rocker switch.

Do you have any recommendations on which rocker switch I should use for this minimum load?
I can only find a two wire one like this but not with a ground wire.

Do you have any suggestion?

Thank you!
Alex

 
  #2  
Old 12-19-20, 09:30 AM
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Go to DIGI-KEY.COM
I just installed a rocker switch onto a LED work light.
 
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Old 12-19-20, 10:09 AM
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I checked digikey but I cannot find that type unless they categorized it differently than 'inline'

Alex
 
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Old 12-19-20, 10:28 AM
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Lowe's
Hillman 15-Amp Black Illuminated Rocker Light Switch in the Light Switches department at Lowes.com

You should be able to find these almost anywhere.

EDIT...look up Carling Technologies on Amazon
 
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Old 12-19-20, 11:32 AM
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But that is not the one I am looking for.
I mean something you can add inline to the cord, like this but with a ground connector too.

Thank you,
Alex
 
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Old 12-19-20, 12:35 PM
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Use a butt splice like this and run the ground wire along the inside edge of the switch.

 
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Old 12-19-20, 12:40 PM
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Is there anything preventing me to use this on a 15A circuit?

Alex
 
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Old 12-19-20, 12:47 PM
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I mean something you can add inline to the cord, like this but with a ground connector too.
What's the reason to have the ground wire included with the switch. The switch is only to make a connection with a hot wire.

And YES to the example you gave. That should do what you want.
 
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Old 12-19-20, 12:53 PM
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I know it works even without the ground, but given that I am going to use an 18/3, I just like the idea to keep the ground there too.

Thank you,
Alex
 
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Old 12-19-20, 01:50 PM
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I've never seen an inline switch that has a ground passthrough. I have seen a metal handy box used for a inline switch, with the appropriate strain relief. Not sure if that could help get what you're looking to do.
 
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Old 12-19-20, 05:33 PM
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I just purchased two 5" recessed LED lights that I want to connect using a simple power cord with an inline switch.
Color me confused. How do you run power cords to recessed fixtures ?
You're talking about using lamp cord into the ceiling ?
Not really a proper installation.
 
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Old 12-19-20, 07:29 PM
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I used the Leviton 5410 for various projects I have done in the past that required a ground wire like my fluorescent strip light I wired the instructions only mention two wires and the various types and gauges of cables supported how ever a ground wire will fit beside the other 2 conductors well at least it did in my case of 18AWG/3C type SJT however your results may vary
 
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Old 12-20-20, 07:39 AM
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Hi All,

Somebody told me that using a cord for those lights is illegal according to code.
Basically, if the fixture was not manufactured for a cord, I should hardwire it.
We are talking about a very limited load here, 12W, but if this is true, I assume it is the same in Canada too.
I just took the image below as I think it is easier to explain:
Please keep in mind that to install the two recessed LED lights (ultra slim) I bought, I will just add a 10" wide plywood, nail it to the studs and leave it open on both sides so that I can easily work with the wiring.
This is a mezzanine, it should be very simple.


So, to make it according to code, I think I need to use a conduit.
1) Which one should I use? PVC or metal? Flexible one??
2) Which wire? 14/2 ? THHN?
3) Once I get to the OSB wall with the conduit, do I have to remain 'external' to the OSB and go down, or should I simply drill a hole in the OSB, make sure the conduit ends there and then, fish the 14/2 down to the AC (inside)?

Thank you,
Alex

 
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Old 12-22-20, 07:45 AM
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Following up my latest post below, does anybody have an answer to my questions?

Thank you!
Alex
 
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Old 12-22-20, 10:02 AM
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There are a few ways you can attack this.

1) Use a full conduit system. Run 1/2" PVC conduit from a metal ceiling box, across the ceiling or joist, then a 90 degree bend, and continue down the wall. Continue the conduit to a switch and to wherever you're getting power. Pull THHN wires (white/black/green). This will result in a professional looking installation.

2) Use NM-B (Romex) cable. You can run it along the side of the joist. Since it's above 6', it's considered that it won't be easily damaged. When you get to the wall, either drill a hole and fish it within the wall, or use a 1/2" PVC or EMT conduit going down the surface of the wall. Here it needs to be protected, either within the wall, or in conduit.

Other notes:
* I wouldn't use a recessed fixture in this case. You don't really have anywhere to recess it. Instead, I'd use a surface mount fixture like this one. You'd mount it to an octagon box.
* Or LED tube fixture (they look like the 4' fluorescent tubes, but LED) are a great solution for a workshop, they give you much more shadow-free lighting.
* Where are you getting power? You can use 14 ga wire, but only if connected to a 15A breaker. So be sure you know what circuit you're tapping into.
 
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Old 12-22-20, 12:16 PM
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Thank you!
Solution #2 sounds to be the simplest, so I will go for it.
I will use a 14/2 as I am on a 15A circuit.
The AC is at the bottom, behind the workbench, so I will install a dual gang box in the wall, just above the level of the workbench, as I need at least two combination switches, one to command the 4' LED light you see above the workbench, the other for the recessed lights.
I will use the recessed LED lights because the light is stronger and because they do not take space, I will just nail a 10" wide plywood from one joist to the other, leave it open on the side, and place there the recessed LED lights.

Thank you for you advice, much appreciated!

Alex
 
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Old 12-23-20, 05:36 AM
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A fixture that is hung (not enclosed) in the ceiling can use swag wiring. Eighteen gauge lamp cord is strung on the underside of the ceiling over to the wall (probably at your work bench), then down to your in line rocker switch, and then to a plug at a wall receptacle.
 
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Old 12-23-20, 01:37 PM
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Allanj,

Do you mean something like this? If so, this is what I had in mind since the beginning, but apparently the question is whether the way I will install the recessed lights is considered 'real' recessed or not.
BTW, the ones I bought are IC rated.
I will just nail a piece of plywood from one joist to the other, 10" wide, drill in a hole for the light and that's it.
However, I will leave it open on the sides, so it is recessed but wide open on the long sides, so that I can easily work in there with my hands.
We all know that an ordinary cable 18/3 with a inline rocker switch, like the one I have linked above, would be sufficient. The question is whether my installation is considered 'recessed' or not by the code.
Frankly, going with a 14/2, conduit etc. does not make any sense to me from a safety point of view, however, if that is what it is required, I will do it.

Alex
 
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Old 12-24-20, 07:37 AM
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Your light is not recessed. That would be a light fixture installed in a permanent wall or ceiling with concealed wiring.

What you are describing is a homemade light fixture (light+board+plug-in cord with switch) that you can mount on open joists with screws or hooks and plug in to a nearby receptacle. It can be removed for any code or home inspection. Not much different than a portable work light.

LED corded string work light
 
 

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