Help replacing ceiling light


  #1  
Old 12-27-20, 02:00 PM
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Help replacing ceiling light

Hi folks,

Just looking for some help replacing a ceiling light in our foyer. It's only controlled from one light switch. The old light was a 4-bulb fixture and each socket had a green, red, and white wire. The new fixture has 3 bulbs, and I'm assuming they're wired together "behind the scenes" because I only have a black, white, and copper wire to work with. Take a look at my awesome () drawing below. The old light fixture is on the left and the ceiling box is on the right. My confusion is converting from the old wiring to the new fixture. I think the one lone red wire is throwing me off. I know the drawing is pretty crazy, but if you just look at one wire at a time it will hopefully make sense.

This is what I'm thinking....let me know if I'm wrong:
1. The 1 white wire from the new fixture couples to the 3 white wires from the box.
2. The 1 black wire from the new fixture couples to the 1 red wire from the box.
3. The 1 copper wire from the new fixture can either be coupled to the existing wire nut of 4 wires (that goes to the metal clip). But that's gonna be messy. The directions say to put the copper wire from the fixture to the green screw on the mounting plate. If I do that, is it ok to have two places for grounding?
4. The 3 black wires from the box can stay coupled together as before.

Thanks!


 
  #2  
Old 12-27-20, 02:42 PM
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This is what I'm thinking....let me know if I'm wrong:
1. The 1 white wire from the new fixture couples to the 3 white wires from the box.
2. The 1 black wire from the new fixture couples to the 1 red wire from the box.
3. The 1 copper wire from the new fixture can either be coupled to the existing wire nut of 4 wires (that goes to the metal clip). But that's gonna be messy. The directions say to put the copper wire from the fixture to the green screw on the mounting plate. If I do that, is it ok to have two places for grounding?
4. The 3 black wires from the box can stay coupled together as before.
Yes you should do all of that.
 
  #3  
Old 12-27-20, 04:32 PM
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Thanks. Why are there so many wires (from the supply / house) side for one stinkin light? Or is it including other lights and switches along the route?
 
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Old 12-27-20, 07:53 PM
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It's very common for some to use the light fixture box as a major circuit splice point.
 
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Old 12-27-20, 09:04 PM
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Cool thanks. I just want to confirm that itís ok that some of the ground wires are grounded using the metal clip to the box, and the fixtureís ground wire is grounded to the green screw on the mounting bracket?
 
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Old 12-27-20, 09:40 PM
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It's very common for some to use the light fixture box as a major circuit splice point
Yes older places did this a lot.

I'm lucky I replaced all of the lights in my apartment from the ugly 1980's style to more modern looking ones and one cable to each light and every switch box has a neutral not that it matters I hate those "smart" devices.

Place was built in the late 1970's had has weird looking cables with a black outer sheath never seen that before.
 
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Old 12-28-20, 01:22 PM
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As part of the installation, I have to couple three solid wires to one stranded wire from the fixture. I stripped the stranded wire a little longer, per some tips from the internet. Iíve also read conflicting tips. Some say to twist all four wires together first, and then twist on the wire nut. Other places say to push all four wires into the nut and then twist. I did the second method. It just doesnít seem to be actually ďtwistingĒ then together. Theyíre tight in there, but I canít confirm the actual ďtwistĒ. When I take the nut off to confirm, theyíre not twisted together but Iím not sure if Iím causing them to untwist when I remove the nut.

Any tips?
 
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Old 12-28-20, 01:26 PM
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Typically one ground wire gets attached to the box with a clip but all ground wires get connected together.
Twist the solid wires first and then add the stranded fixture wire.
 
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Old 12-29-20, 08:00 AM
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Twist the solid wires first and then add the stranded fixture wire.
So Iím gonna twist the solid wires with pliers, but then just wrap the stranded wire around it and then add the wire nut?
 
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Old 12-29-20, 09:00 AM
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Yes.... that is correct.
If you try to twist that thin stranded wire with the solid wiring.... it will usually shred.
 
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Old 12-29-20, 09:04 AM
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You should also strip the stranded a bit longer than you normally would for a solid so it can wrap around the solid wires.
 
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Old 12-29-20, 09:15 AM
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Thank you again. Yes, Iíve stripped it a little longer than the solid wires. And yes Iíve already experienced the shredding/breaking of the wire lol. Same with the bare stranded wire that Iím screwing underneath the green screw on the mounting bracket. Screwed it down too hard and shred it to pieces ugh.

Would it be bad technique to wire nut all the white solid wires together with a pigtail coming out and then wire nut that pigtail to the one white stranded wire? Iím noticing itís manageable/easy to twist one solid wire with one stranded wire. Just not sure if thatís poor technique.
 
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Old 12-29-20, 09:20 AM
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You can add a solid wire tail to the splice. Not normally done but nothing wrong with doing it.
 
  #14  
Old 12-29-20, 09:34 AM
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Hereís a picture of what I meant in case my description was clear as mud.



 
 

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