7" hole saw for range hood


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Old 02-02-21, 05:08 PM
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7" hole saw for range hood

Even cheap range hoods now use a 7" round hole. (they also offer rectangular holes though). Unfortunately, I can only find 6" hole saws at home depot and menards. Where do I even find 7" vent parts for a range hood? Am I better off going with the rectangular vent installation?
 

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02-03-21, 04:40 AM
Pilot Dane
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As the hole gets bigger the torque you must fight increases. Even a 4" hole saw can fight back pretty hard. If you do try using a 7" hole saw, especially in a tight space, make sure you use a drill with a clutch so it will let go instead of hurting your wrists. With anything 5" or larger I'm no longer even thinking of a hole saw. I mark the hole. Then drill a smaller hole at the edge. Insert a reciprocating saw blade through the hole then cut out the larger hole. It's about the same process you'd have to use if you decide to use a rectangular duct.
 
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Old 02-02-21, 05:47 PM
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Depending on the material you are cutting through, a drywall saw will work. Or you can use a jigsaw, reciprocating saw, or even a series of holes drilled with a smaller drill bit. You can also get an adjustable hole cutter. There are lots of ways to make a hole in a wall.

You can order a 7" hole saw online and typically Amazon will deliver in 2 days. Just be VERY careful! If that hole saw grabs you can darn near break a wrist.
 
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Old 02-02-21, 06:43 PM
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Menards has an adjustable hole saw that goes up to 7". But it is kind of a piece of garbage. Good for drywall but thats about it. For one hole, I would just trace it, or use an old fashioned drywall hole cutter.

And 7" duct is a stock item at menards but some fittings might be special order. You just need to plan ahead for what you need.
 
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Old 02-03-21, 04:40 AM
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As the hole gets bigger the torque you must fight increases. Even a 4" hole saw can fight back pretty hard. If you do try using a 7" hole saw, especially in a tight space, make sure you use a drill with a clutch so it will let go instead of hurting your wrists. With anything 5" or larger I'm no longer even thinking of a hole saw. I mark the hole. Then drill a smaller hole at the edge. Insert a reciprocating saw blade through the hole then cut out the larger hole. It's about the same process you'd have to use if you decide to use a rectangular duct.
 
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