Cannot turn light on in a ceiling light/fan combo


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Old 12-23-21, 08:28 AM
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Cannot turn light on in a ceiling light/fan combo

I have a ceiling light/fan combo that has a weird issue. The light suddenly won't work (switch cannot turn the lights) on, but the fan still works as usual. This is a strange problem, because this light/fan combo is a very simple one. There is no remote control, no digital parts in it. All switches are mechanical. Today I went ahead and dissasembled the light circuit, I found a part that I could not understand (see picture 1 below). The continuity check showed that this is where the circuit breaks, that's why the light won't turn on.

IMAGE 1:


The unknown circuit that sits in between 120VAC power line and the light switch

Where the unknown component sits is in the hot power line in the overall wiring diagram of the light:

* thick blue wire from the combo connector (hot wire [120 V] from the grid)
=> to light pink wire
=> to an unknown component
=> to light white wire
=> to thick black ware in light complex.

* thick white wire from the combo connector (cold wire back to the grid)
=> to thick white wire on the light complex.

I went ahead and dissasembled the part, expecting this was a mere connector (splicer). No, I was wrong. It was some sort of device, and it showed the part was burned.

IMAGE 2:

Inside the unknown component: the part is now burned.


Can somebody help me undrstand what this part is? What is its function? Where can I get its replacement? Why is it burned?

FYT: Now I replaced all the light bulbs with LED bulbs (about 4.5 watts each, Candelabra-style, instead of the 25-40 watt filament lightbulbs), so the power load of the light is actually very little. I was tempted to sidestep the issue by removing that unknown component altogether, because the light bulbs are 120VAC anyway. Is that ok?
 
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Old 12-23-21, 09:29 AM
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The Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires this fan to be equipped with a 190 watt limiting device.
If lamp wattage exceeds 190 watts, the ceiling fan's light kit will shut off automatically.


That is a current limiter or wattage reducer. Y59 R 130C
At one time Lowes had them. Not sure who has them at this time.

Can you bypass it..... technically yes but it would void UL certification of the fan.

Ceiling fan parts
 
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Old 12-26-21, 06:08 PM
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I think I found the answer after googling around some more. The device said above is called "LIMITOR", and the purpose is to limit the amount of wattage that can be transmitted to the lightbulb assembly. it is a new DOE requirement, which you can see in the following two articles:

https://upgradedhome.com/is-it-safe-...-ceiling-fans/
https://airflowacademy.com/is-it-saf...a-ceiling-fan/

It sounds like it is safe to remove, and even more so if you are using only LEDs (which I think should be the case today to conserve energy, anyway.

CAVEAT: I am not an electrician, so take this reply with a grain of salt. If in doubt, talk to a licensed electrican!
 
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Old 12-26-21, 07:14 PM
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As I mentioned.....since it's an original part of the fan..... removing it could violate the UL rating.
 
 

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