Help finding Lamp(s) for Webcam Videos


  #1  
Old 02-27-22, 09:13 AM
abbynormal52's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: US
Posts: 32
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Help finding Lamp(s) for Webcam Videos

Hi all,

searched the forum for an answer, but didn't find one so I'll ask here. I want to shoot videos of doing my stretch-band exercises, and possibly other body-weight exercises, but my room is too dark. I have a small livingroom, and there is a large picture window, but the lighting is still poor from that. I want to get a floor lamp that would still be decorative but functional. I see a lot of info on youtube etc. but like talking with folks here about things I want to set up, or fix, etc.

Does anyone have ideas for me, or questions about what I have to work with? I'd so appreciate the help,
Thanks much, Denise

PS Here a link on lamps I've viewed so far, I just don't know if they'd work for videos. I see the more professional ones but they are ugly looking, and 95% of the time, I won't be using them. I don't have storage for one either. Apartment is where I live, small 1-bedroom
Only under 100 dollars, or lower if possible??
 

Last edited by PJmax; 02-27-22 at 10:38 AM. Reason: removed link for deacalf coffee ?
  #2  
Old 02-27-22, 03:24 PM
Z
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,139
Received 427 Upvotes on 380 Posts
A ring light or similar webcam light works well for reasonably close videos, and is the right price point. $40-50.
I use this one, but there are lots of similar ones available.

But since you're further away from the light, you might need something brighter and more powerful. Also, a single light is usually not the best lighting. Following studio lighting, you'd most likely want a key light (at the camera), a fill light (off to the side), and back light. Example: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three-point_lighting

Of course, you can do this with standard room lighting, or you can get lights specifically for video. Amazon has some 3-tripod lights for less than $100, but I can't vouch for their quality.
 
abbynormal52 voted this post useful.
  #3  
Old 02-27-22, 05:36 PM
abbynormal52's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: US
Posts: 32
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks so much I will take a look at the links you put in for me. Yes, I'll be standing back maybe 5 feet from the webcam that is setting on top of my monitor. I like the small light I could set right next to it, but I think the 3 tripod lights sound interesting too. If they are small enough, haven't clicked the link yet, I could possibly find space to store them.

Here's a floor lamp I think might be good, feedback welcome. This one would be good over my desk area when I need to do any paperwork. It's spendy though, I'll keep looking, and check out those tripod lights too:
Floor Lamp

 
  #4  
Old 02-28-22, 08:42 AM
T
Member
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: US
Posts: 1,237
Received 209 Upvotes on 183 Posts
Also consider how you light things. Stark shadows are generally frowned upon, unless you are doing a film-noir exercise video. Do a search for how to light a tv studio and you can find some really good lighting tips.
 
abbynormal52 voted this post useful.
  #5  
Old 03-05-22, 05:05 AM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 4,581
Upvotes: 0
Received 288 Upvotes on 263 Posts
Start with two lamp fixtures, either table or floor fixtures. One a few feet to the left of the camera, the other a few feet to the right. The light should come from above the camera level. You can vary the exact position so the video looks good.

You may be able to get by using your regular portable room lights by taking off the lamp shades, saving the need to spend money on and then stash away specialized photography light fixtures.

Light fixtures designed for video or photography are "ugly" because they have large reflectors to direct the light at the subject (you) instead of every which way including the wall behind the camera. "Small" reflectors might be inefficient if the bulb shadows some of its light coming back out from the reflector. You can make up for that by using higher lumen lamp bulbs (provided the fixtures accept the higher wattages), or using additional fixtures, or setting the camera to lighten things up (including increasing the ISO for a still camera) but watch out for added graininess in the picture.

If you need more than four fixtures, it is okay to have one group off to the left and another group off to the right instead of spacing them evenly behind the camera. Again see what looks best on your video.

You can also experiment with different lamp bulb color temperatures for light coming from different directions.
 

Last edited by AllanJ; 03-05-22 at 05:37 AM.
abbynormal52 voted this post useful.
  #6  
Old 03-05-22, 08:18 AM
abbynormal52's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: US
Posts: 32
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
AllanJ This really sounds good for my apartment, and my particular needs Plus I will be taking this very slow to see if I'm going to enjoy doing videos. I'm clipping your directions, and thank you!!
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: