Replacing bathroom ceiling heater with light


  #1  
Old 11-16-22, 11:59 AM
RRDinOregon's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2022
Posts: 2
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Replacing bathroom ceiling heater with light

I removed a Broan ceiling heat lamp/fan and am preparing to install a simple light fixture. The Broan was controlled by one switch ganged with other switches on the wall. There are four wires, red black white and ground, in the ceiling box. The new light has a black white and ground wire. I'm unsure how to wire up the new light and internet searches refer to a ceiling fan with blades instead of the heat lamp fixture. Both the red and black wires are hot when the wall switch is flipped on. The second photo is after removing the giant old heater and installing a ceiling box and drywall. Any help would be appreciated. Sincerely, RRD.



 
  #2  
Old 11-17-22, 09:22 AM
T
Member
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: US
Posts: 1,236
Received 209 Upvotes on 183 Posts
The 3-wire (plus ground) cable was to control light and heat separately with separate switches. Black & White for the light, Red & White for the heat. Note that I don't mention the ground, but everywhere it appears, it must be connected to the box (if metal) and to any devices (if ground connections are present). The Source is the hot from the electrical panel, the Neutral (always white or gray) is from the electrical panel and the Load is the dev‪ice being powered.

The NEC devotes an entire article to switches. And in that article, it prohibits switching the neutral (grounded conductor) or the grounding conductor. Think of the neutral as running unbroken from the load (your light) to the neutral bar in the electrical pane. Put simply, a switch must be on the hot side between the source and the load; never on the neutral side.

All wiring should be done with power to the circuit turned off at the electrical panel. Confirm this at the switch and light boxes with a meter.

At the switch box:
The simplest way to wire this is to connect the hot from the electrical panel to one switch terminal and the black to the fixture box to the other switch terminal. The neutrals should still be connected. Disconnect the red and cap it with a wire nut or several layers of electrical tape.

At the fixture box:
Connect the black from the switch box to the black of the fixture and the white from the switch box to the white of the fixture. Cap the red conductor.

The avoids having to re-identify the neutral in the Switch Leg (cable from the fixture box to the switch box) and meets code (the switch is in the hot side of the circuit.
 
RRDinOregon voted this post useful.
  #3  
Old 11-17-22, 11:11 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 65,668
Received 4,093 Upvotes on 3,676 Posts
There was a three wire cable run so that fan and heat could be controlled separately.

Since there wasn't room at the switchbox for two switches for the heat lamp.... both red and black wires were switched on the switch. So at the ceiling box use ground, white (neutral) and either red or black. Cap off the wire not used.
 
RRDinOregon voted this post useful.
  #4  
Old 11-18-22, 05:18 PM
RRDinOregon's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2022
Posts: 2
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Well thank you both ThisOldMan and PJmax for your timely replies. I sincerely appreciate your advice on this matter and I can now wrap up the remodel now and move on.
What I didn't mention in the original post was that I stepped through the ceiling while working on another project in the attic (hard to see those rafters in the blown in insulation) and then decided to get rid of the antique heat lamp fixture if was going to repair the drywall. Never thought I was going to be 'That guy'. Thanks again.


 
CircuitBreaker voted this post useful.
  #5  
Old 11-18-22, 07:56 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 65,668
Received 4,093 Upvotes on 3,676 Posts
Don't feel bad. At least that's your house.
I've put my foot thru a customers living room ceiling.
 
CircuitBreaker voted this post useful.
  #6  
Old 11-21-22, 06:34 AM
T
Member
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: US
Posts: 1,236
Received 209 Upvotes on 183 Posts
I put my foot through the ceiling over a receptionist's desk. Told them to have it repaired and send me the invoice. They did and I paid it.

Was back there several months later and was horrified at what I had paid for! Turned out that someone else had stepped through the repaired spot and did their own half-xxxed repair.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: