Typical watts for low voltage landscape/yard lights


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Old 03-17-24, 08:10 PM
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Typical watts for low voltage landscape/yard lights

I want to purchase these but they don't state wattage (unless I am missing that.) I am also wondering if a 16GA landscape wire is ok for these lights. I plan to install all 10 lights. I saw very similar lights on Temu that were rated 5 watts here.

Link to -> lights here
Link to -> wire here


 
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Old 03-18-24, 05:00 AM
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One reviewer said he used a 12 vac, 90 watt transformer to run the 10 lights.
 
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Old 03-18-24, 06:19 PM
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Those use a 350LM cob chip and the specs for that part shows 5 watts @ 12-14vdc/vac
 
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Old 03-21-24, 10:48 AM
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Is the 16AWG wire spec for these lights?
 
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Old 03-21-24, 11:01 AM
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Spec? It's not that easy. The size of wire depends on the load/wattage and distance, especially for DC. There are charts and calculators online that can help. 16ga might be fine for a shorter distance but as the length of wire increases so does the voltage drop. It is common to shoot for less than 2 or 3% voltage drop in a circuit but with DC landscape lighting it's not critical. With too much voltage drop lights at the end can be noticeably dimmer than those closer to the power supply.
 
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Old 03-21-24, 11:21 AM
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Distance intended to install all ten lights is about 125ft, front and left side of the house. Just did these two calcs but I think I am doing something wrong.
+
As for Amps, I took 10lamps x 5watts / 12v = 4.1 amps. Is that correct?






 

Last edited by bambata; 03-21-24 at 11:40 AM.
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Old 03-21-24, 11:57 AM
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I do not know about the power supplied for your lights. Is it 12 volts AC or DC?

Your math is correct. 4.2 amps (4.1666 actually)

In the first image you have "single phase" selected. Change that to DC if it is DC

Your second image you input 40 amps instead of 4.
 
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Old 03-21-24, 12:17 PM
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The lights run on 12v either DC or AC per below.....
  • 【Safe Low Voltage】 AC/DC 12V working voltage is compatible with most low voltage landscape lighting systems, an additional low voltage transformer is required for installation (not included in this kit). Low-voltage landscape lights are the first choice for residential outdoor lighting.

The first calc has AC only, thus single phase entry. Second calc is specific for DC circuits, now with 4amps, looks like 14GA is the min. acceptable, yes?



 
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Old 03-21-24, 12:23 PM
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I had a power supply in the garage but looks like it's way too small after these calcs. So have to get one-will this one here suffice or is this one here an over kill?














 
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Old 03-21-24, 01:50 PM
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Your calculated load is just over 4A.
So either one will work but the 5A supply will run hot since it's running over 80% of its listed supply amperage.

A 100' of #16 wire should be adequate for the job. Even if you get a slight drop.... should not be any big deal with LED fixtures. The larger the wire gauge the less the drop.

I use #12 for all my installations as I buy it on 1000' reels.
 
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Old 03-21-24, 02:45 PM
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The devices you reference in post 9 are power supplies whose input is 120 vac and output is 12 vdc. You can also use a transformer that has 120 vac primary and 12 vac secondary. The picture for the power supplies show the 12 vdc output is on a sheathed power cable. To attach the landscape light to the power cable with the connectors provided, you need access to the hot and common wires individually because the connectors are insulation piercing. With a transformer, you can run individual hot and common wires from the transformer secondary and attach landscape lights using provided connectors. Have you considered how to waterproof these connections if located outside? Using a transformer, you can run 2 sets of wires (5 landscape lights per set) reducing power cable length to 63 feet. 16 gauge wire is more than adequate. To be save, would use a transformer rated at least 6 amps at 12 vac.
 
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Old 03-31-24, 09:47 AM
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@beelzebob
Have you considered how to waterproof these connections if located outside?
​​​​​​​I thought these provided connectors are waterproof designed for outside? If not, what ideas can you guys suggest to waterproof the connections?
 
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Old 04-22-24, 10:04 AM
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I decided to use an ATX psu, my old tower PC was collecting dust in the garage. I am using the yellow, 12v line and black for ground. This should be 10A (or is it 13A?) The PSU is connected to a 10amp Sonoff WiFi switch with an/off schedule to run between 8pm to 6am. What I noticed was of the 8 lights installed, even though they are constantly lit, they do have a very very slight flicker, not on or off but just some flickering. Then after 2..4 minutes PSU would shutdown but wifi switch would remain on with normal 120v output. I checked everything over, re-tested and same result. Previously for a whole week I had only 2 lights connected and everything functioned aok. After adding the last 6 lights yesterday is when this issue has come up. Does this mean these lights are drawing more amps, power, current....something more than the PSU can provide? Strange because this PSU has more than sufficient amps capacity. I don't know what to think. Any suggestions?






 

Last edited by bambata; 04-22-24 at 11:54 AM.
 

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