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Chrysler Magnapower 105


teddford's Avatar
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Join Date: May 2001
Posts: 30
TX

05-27-03, 05:25 PM   #1  
Chrysler Magnapower 105

I have a boat I have not run in 6 years and I want to get it up and running.

Nothing fancy. It's an old 1969 Stylecraft with a Chrysler Magnaforce 105 (Model # 10575).

I bought this boat used several years ago and used it for about 2 years. I quit running the boat 6 years ago after screwing up the oil/gas mixture. I ran the boat heavy on the oil side, not lean!

Anyhow, I recently had a mechanic check the motor out.

This is what he found:

He ran a combustion test and found the following:

Cylinder 1 = 120 lbs.

Cylinder 2 = 50 lbs.

Cylinder 3 = 120 lbs.

Cylinder 4 = 125 lbs.

Obviously, Cylinder #2 needs work. I've got no pressing time frame to restore this 1969 motor.

Is this something that I could rebuild? How extensive of a repair do you think this might be?

Also, are there any "how to" manuals available to walk me through the repair sequence?

Expert advice appreciated!

Thanks,

Ted

 
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BoatMech's Avatar
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Posts: 592

05-27-03, 07:26 PM   #2  
Due to the limited parts availability i would get it running and
give it a good decarb and see if it will free up the rings, worth a try anyway. Follow the directions on the can and always keep
water to the engine whenever you run it in the yard. Its a good idea to take the prop off too, just in case the pooch happens
to go sniffing around at the wrong time.
Let us know how the compression came back. Scott

 
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05-28-03, 04:16 PM   #3  
Well, darn!

Well, I was mistaken!

Cylinder 1 = 130 lbs.

Cylinder 2 = 130 lbs.

Cylinder 3 = 50 lbs.

& Cylinder 4 = 135 lbs.

I tried the de-carb. No luck.

I ran compression tests again on the cylinders and came up with the same results. You could actually hear the difference in Cylinder # 3. There was no resistance at all...it turned over too easily.

I can only imagine that work needs to be done on this cylinder.


I'm learning as I go along. Tell me what to do to effect repairs now.

Thanks,

Ted

 
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05-28-03, 10:37 PM   #4  
The quick way to see what you are in for is to take off the
cylinder head. It will probably have very bad scoring on the walls
relative to your comp loss.
If there is no scoring you might be able to save it. We can free
up the rings and get you back on the water in no time.
Dont break any head bolts! Talk to you soon, scott

 
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06-01-03, 02:36 PM   #5  
Hi Scott

Scott,

I had a friend that suggested that I go ahead and start the motor to see if the heat generated by the motor would free up the rings.

I have a new battery with 1000 CCA and the starter has a very difficult time turning the gears. the old rrrr --- rrr--- rrr --- rrr...etc.

I then attached some cables to my truck while running to aid the battery. I got the same result. (I feel really snakebitten).

I'll check back during the early part of the week to see what you think. Otherwise, by Wednesday, I'll take the cylinder head off like you suggested to see how bad it looks.

I'll report back.

Thanks,

Ted

 
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06-07-03, 07:39 PM   #6  
Latest on the 1968 Chrysler Magnaforce

Last Saturday, I was able to get the motor started.

The motor dragged terribly when I tried to start it with my new battery (1000 CCA). I used jumper cables attached to my truck and got the motor to start up.

I has a hose and a water attachment to the lower unit with the water running. I ran the motor for about 30 seconds. After not seeing any water coming from the lower unit pump, I shut the motor off and decided to wait until this weekend to do further work.

Friday night, I took the boat out to a local lake and launched it. Unfortunately, the motor would not turn over very well. I know the battery was fully charged and eventually paddled the boat back to the trailer and returned home.

Being the novice that I am, I went out and bought another battery this morning and hooked it up in series with the other battery. Same result, the starter has a very difficult time turning the motor to start it. I called a local shop that specializes in old Chrysler Magnaforce outboards. The mechanic knew my outboard well and even identified it as being a 1968 model. He told me to try and turn the flywheel with my hands. I had great difficulty in turning the flywheel and he said that the motor was "locked-up", and that I needed to take the head off and clean out the cylinders and clean off the pistons since they probably had rust on them after all the years of setting up.

I took the head off and noted that there was very little rust on the sides of the cylinder walls. To my delight, there was NO SCORING whatsoever on the cylinder walls. However, the top of the pistons were heavily blackened and caked with soot. I spent the entire day with a dremel, cleaning the cylinder walls and the top of the pistons, then lubricating all of it with "Deep Creep". The only parts I couldn't clean were the chambers at the bottom of the cylinder walls that become visible when the pistins are depressed. Afterwards, I reassembled the head, cleaned the plugs and tried starting the outboard again.

It still drags terribly and refused to start. Also, with the spark plugs in, it is hard to spin the flywheel by hand.

I have spent a tremendous amount of time with this oldie and am at a loss as what to do next.

Any advise?

Thanks,

Ted


Last edited by teddford; 06-08-03 at 06:47 AM.
 
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06-11-03, 11:37 PM   #7  
I feel that you have done just about all you can.
The bearings must be rusted to the crank or the lower
roller bearing is seizing. It can be restored, but with some
serious effort, it wont cost much though. If you
want we can walk thru the next steps to removing
the powerhead and disassembling the crankcase.
Good work to this point, scott

 
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