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Float adjustment in a carb


bculli05's Avatar
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07-23-04, 11:18 AM   #1  
Float adjustment in a carb

Hi all,
I have an 86 bayliner with a 225E Volvo Penta engine. I recently rebuilt the crab due the an abnoral amount of fuel in the water. Good news is, its running much better, bad news, its still disbursing a little fuel. The rebuild included gaskets, a a new float and needle. I was told if I was having float problems to just purchase new. Long story short, the kit never came with float adjustment specs. I just adjusted it so when I turn the carb upside down or the float in the closed position. the float does not exceed the rim level. I know there is an actual spec. Does anyone have any idea what is may be. I had a service book, but I cant seem to find it anywhere. Also, I am an novice carb guy so any help or suggestions on adjusting this float assembly would be most appreciated.
Thanks,

Brian

 
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07-23-04, 03:02 PM   #2  
Hello: Brian

When the carb is inverted upside down with the bowl off, the float should be level. Standard setting and adjustment for float carbs. If this is what you mean and have done, the setting should be correct.

Chances are some unseen fuel passage in the baody of the carb is still blocked or restricted. Try using an can of carb cleaner with those plastic tube extensions. Insert he plastic tube into every visable opening and passage and blast out any gum, clog, blockage and or restriction.

Be sure to do likewise to any external fuel adjustment screw opening. Remove the screw and blast into it. Wear eye protection!

Count the number of turns it takes to lightly bottom out the screw first to know it's exact setting outwards. Reinstall the screw(s) outwards the same amount it took to bottom it out lightly.

Kindly use the reply button to add any additional information or questions, etc. to this thread. Using this method also moves the topic back up to the top of the daily list automatically.

Regards, Good Luck & Safe Boating.
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07-23-04, 06:57 PM   #3  
what kind of carb is it, rochester or holley.

 
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07-24-04, 10:09 AM   #4  
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Its a rodchester carb. From the replies above, I separted the tophalf of the carb and cleaned the heck out of every piece possible with carb cleaner. I didnt remove the fuel mixture xrews though and clean there. I had someone that knows carbs come over and adjust them for me. They were originally set to 4 1/2 turns out which he said was way out. He adjusted them to 2 turns out and its runs much better but still have the fuel in the water problem and its going through a ton os fuel

 
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07-24-04, 12:15 PM   #5  
but still have the fuel in the water problem and its going through a ton os fuel
If you didnt pump all the water out of the tank. It will get up there and screw up the float no matter how good you set it right. That would be like on the boats about every 6 months they put a tube down to the tank bottom and pump some to make sure no water has come in in the vents. Clean up the tank first then set the carb.

ED

 
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07-24-04, 12:51 PM   #6  
Hello: Brian

As Ed mentioned, if there is still water in the fuel tank or fuel system, it must be removed. Failure to do so will just recreate the problem all over again.

Check the spark plugs for fuel fouling. Black carbon sooting and or carbon spots, etc. Chances are the fuel mixtures are still too rich. Try 1/2 turn less on each screw and note any changes in engine running performaces.

Engine should run well in all rpm ranges, without hard starting, stalling, hesitations or rough running. Any such may indicate incorrect settings or carb internal fuel flow restrictions still exist.

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07-24-04, 02:05 PM   #7  
.02 more cents on this Ted for newbes. On the out board motors they have they own gas tanks and a vent or pressure in them when the hose is on them. So they are ok here. Now take an I/O and you have a tank in the boat that has a vent to it over board. Now rain wind and waves could get some water in it. Then you have when you let the boat just set for a time. On a trailer or in the water with 1/4 tank a 1/2 tank say 3/4 tank . All the time the air goes in and out of the tank when it gets cool then hot or warm. So you get water in it. Take like on a plane private or commercial. First thing you do if your done for the trip or day is fill the tanks. You never let your plane set with half full tanks. What is the first thing you do when you go to take your plane out? Is go around and check each tank for water . So think about this in you boat also. Big and small.

ED

 
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