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Winterizing I/O Volvo Penta 6 cyl.


fisherlady's Avatar
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10-18-04, 10:30 AM   #1  
fisherlady
Winterizing I/O Volvo Penta 6 cyl.

Hello
Am new in the winterizing arena and am looking for advice to winterizing 2001 I/O 6 cyl. Volvo Penta. The water has been drained and RV antifreeze at the ready but need to have the proper sequence to continue. Am not able to pay to have this done this year but feel confident in doing myself with some guidance.
Thank you so much.

 
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parothd's Avatar
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10-18-04, 02:42 PM   #2  
parothd
I used to have a very nice check list of things to do... let me see if I can find it. If not I'll try to post a general sequence of steps that I use.

Terry

 
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10-18-04, 07:23 PM   #3  
Mike_Maranto
Help from DIY web page

here is the page on DIY that gave me some idea how to winterize step by step.
http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=146226

 
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10-19-04, 02:29 PM   #4  
parothd
That is a great winterizing plan.

The only thing I didn't see on the list that I always do is to spray down all the metal parts of the engine and drive with non-flammable CRC or equivalent. This is actually made from fish oils and poses no fire danger when the engine is run for the first time in the spring. It will keep the engine looking brand new, no rust even where you might have paint scratches, and you will never have corroded bolts, nuts or electrical connections.

Don't spray CRC on rubber parts like hoses and belts. I don't recommend rubber and vinyl shine products for these either. I have read numerous tests and reports by tire companies that point to them as a cause of premature deterioration. If you want to protect your hoses, go to your local tire store and see if they will sell you a little Rubber Lube. They use it to lubricate the beads of tires when they mount them and it does no harm while keeping rubber hoses looking brand new. There are also some very good silicone sprays that work, but you have to find one that is not solvent based. The silicone does not hurt the rubber, it's the solvent base that can do damage.

Don't use any of these products on your belts.

Small tips given to me by one of the best marina mechanics on the Chesapeake that have worked extremely well for me over the years.

Terry

 
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10-19-04, 06:56 PM   #5  
Snydz
gas tank

Posted By: parothd That is a great winterizing plan.

The only thing I didn't see on the list that I always do is to spray down all the metal parts of the engine and drive with non-flammable CRC or equivalent. This is actually made from fish oils and poses no fire danger when the engine is run for the first time in the spring. It will keep the engine looking brand new, no rust even where you might have paint scratches, and you will never have corroded bolts, nuts or electrical connections.

Don't spray CRC on rubber parts like hoses and belts. I don't recommend rubber and vinyl shine products for these either. I have read numerous tests and reports by tire companies that point to them as a cause of premature deterioration. If you want to protect your hoses, go to your local tire store and see if they will sell you a little Rubber Lube. They use it to lubricate the beads of tires when they mount them and it does no harm while keeping rubber hoses looking brand new. There are also some very good silicone sprays that work, but you have to find one that is not solvent based. The silicone does not hurt the rubber, it's the solvent base that can do damage.

Don't use any of these products on your belts.

Small tips given to me by one of the best marina mechanics on the Chesapeake that have worked extremely well for me over the years.

Terry
Do you have to fill the gas tank all the way to the top? If so why?

 
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10-20-04, 10:38 AM   #6  
parothd
Yes... filling it minimizes condensation in the tank.

Typically there are some pretty big changes in temperature from the time you winterize until you open her back up in the spring. Each time there is a change, especially a short term one, the fuel in the tank will take longer to change temperature than the outside air. This causes expansion and contraction of the fuel, pushing air out on expansion and pulling it in on contraction. As damp outside air is pulled into the tank the moisture will condense against the cold walls of the tank and run to the bottom. The more exposed tank surface the greater the impact of this.

Filling the tank all the way minimizes this effect, and including the appropriate amount of fuel stabilizer keeps the fuel fresh and takes care of what little condensation gets into the tank.

A tip: I had a friend try to seal off the tank vent thinking this would prevent this from happening. We had a relatively warm day in January which caused the fuel to expand. With no where to vent this expansion the vent hose blew off the hull fitting. Luckily he found this when rigging her out in the spring, but it could have been disastrous.

I hope that helps,
Terry

 
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10-30-04, 05:22 PM   #7  
Snydz
do I need to fill tank all the way?????

Yes It helps greatly. Your comments are appreciated.

snydz

 
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11-12-04, 05:53 PM   #8  
i've owned my boat for 14 years & i've never filled the tank for winter lay up. i've even left it nearly empty a few times & have never had a problem starting it in the spring due to bad fuel. i add a bottle of sta-bil & let the engine run a few minutes to distribue the stuff thru the fuel system. but, to each his own. if u want to spring for a full tank, it's yer nickel.

 
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11-29-04, 05:12 AM   #9  
Leon Phelps
empty vs full

The whole question is presupposed by possible final results. One is having a full tank of stale or souped up with additive gas. The other is having water in the tank. I have a boat with a 200 gallon tank. I run it until close to empty every year. For that much gas, I do not want to have stale/additive laden gas in the tank. I also make sure that I drain the carb, so there is no gas in it. This is not recommended because seals can dry out with no fluid on them. I have had carbs that the floats go bad when left in gas over the winter, so I do this. On my smaller boats, I do the fill up thing and add stabil gas additive.

My take on the whole process....not scientific.

 
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