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Winterizing


brmcc74's Avatar
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10-18-04, 07:36 PM   #1  
Winterizing

I bought a boat last spring and living in near chicago have to consider freezing temps. I am leaving my boat in the garage over the winter. Is there any advantage to turning the engine over throughout the winter? Its a bayliner with a 3.0 mercruiser i/o . The garage isn't heated. What other tips should follow for the winter.thank you.

 
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10-19-04, 02:09 PM   #2  
parothd
If you change the oil before putting it up for the winter, properly fog the engine, and pull the plugs and spray some fogger in each cylinder, then the answer is no... don't turn ot over once winterized. In fact turning it over would wipe away the coating on the cylinder walls allowing them to rust. It could also pump out some of your antifreeze which not only prevents freezing, but internal cooling system rust too.

Also don't assume that storing it in a garage, even a heated garage, is sufficient instead of winterizing. One bad cold snap accompanied by a power failure could, and often does, cause big problems.

I hope that helps,

Terry

 
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10-20-04, 12:23 PM   #3  
Just like to add We try to run the carb dry and add fuel stabilizer to the tanks if there is fuel in them. Be sure and check lower unit for water in it. If so drain it out.

ED


Last edited by Ed Imeduc; 10-23-04 at 01:36 PM.
 
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10-20-04, 02:01 PM   #4  
what is the deal with the anti freeze? what should be done with this>? thanks for the power outage advice, very true possibility.

 
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10-21-04, 10:56 AM   #5  
parothd
Antifreeze helps prevent any remaining water in the engine from freezing and prevents rust inside the water passages over the winter. Remember that the optimum combination for rust is a little water and a little air, which is the state you leave your engine in when you only drain the block. Adding antifreeze after draining coats the inside of the water jacket of the engine minimizing rust over the winter. It also floods into the few places that you can't drain easily and helps prevent them from freezing.

Just be sure to use low or no toxicity antifreeze. Don't just grab a jug of standard automotive antifreeze. It will work fine for winterizing, but consider the impact when you start it up in the lake in the spring and pump all of that highly toxic solution into your favorite body of water. It is also very harmful to pets and other wildlife. Many dogs die each year because they are drawn to the sweet taste of spilled antifreeze and are poisoned when they ingest it.

I hope that helps

Terry

 
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10-22-04, 07:51 PM   #6  
where do i use the anti freeze? i have a quick drain hose set up should i just suck some up through these hoses?

 
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10-25-04, 05:36 AM   #7  
parothd
Hmmm... not sure I know what a quick drain hose is... but if you read the list on the link for winterizing, it gives a pretty clear picture of what to do here. You will drain out all the water that you can and then pour in a 50/50 (or as prescribed by manufacturer) mixture of antifreeze and water through the engine cooling hoses to get into the block and manifolds.

I actually drain my block then start the engine with a flush muff attached which is connected to a 4 gallon bucket of antifreeze solution (2 gallons Antifreeze + 2 gallons water). I have found that for my engine this is just about perfect to get it all the way through and make sure my pumps and all the nooks and crannies are covered. Might be a bit more than actually required, but I prefer to err on the side of safety.

Cneck out the winterizing list here on the board. It's very good and well explained.

I hope that helps.
Terry

 
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10-25-04, 05:19 PM   #8  
Im glad you said the bucket thing, thats what i was gonna do. As far as quick drain hoses, i have an 04 bayliner and the dealer showed me 2 lines that have quick disconnection fittings on them incases of a quick freeze. one is block drain and the other is exhaust drain. he said if one night gets cold towards freezing just pull the disconnect, pull the plug and liet it drain. thx for advice

 
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11-14-04, 04:10 AM   #9  
Hello: brmcc74

Few more things to tend to when storing a boat. Plenty more info here.

Winterizing info:
http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=146226

DIY'S Boat Pages:
http://doityourself.com/boats/index.shtml

Regards, Good Luck & Safe Boating.
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11-14-04, 04:26 PM   #10  
why go thru all the bother of using the disconnects? winterize it & u won't have to worry. winterization involves more than just protecting the engine from a freeze up. the gear lube should be changed, oil changed, fuel system needs to be treated etc, etc. don't skimp on this aspect of boat maintenance. if u do it will bite u back hard in the pocketbook. by the way. u said u had an '04. you're taking a risk here in my opinion. u should have the dealer doing the winterization. and keep the receipt. if u diy & something goes wrong, you're warranty won't be worth the paper it's printed on. just food for thought.

 
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