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2 Cycle Oil [Merged Threads]


Dsherm112's Avatar
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05-19-05, 12:39 PM   #1  
2 Cycle Oil

I have a 1963 40 HP Johnson Outboat motor. The previous owner says I can use regular 30 wt oil to mix instead of buying 2 cycle oil. Is this correct?

Sherm

 
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05-19-05, 03:09 PM   #2  
2 cycle oil

Yes, you may use 30 weight oil instead of 2 cycle.

On that motor the mixing and start instructions are on a plaque inside the motor cover at the front just above the latch.

Mix 1 US quart 30 weight oil per 6 US gallons. Ratio of 1:24.

I have a 1962 engine, I read recently that mechanical problems with the Johnson 40hp were resolved in 1962, and the engine was reliable. I find parts for the engine are available.

I have not started this one neither. Hope to do so this weekend. Gave the rope a tug just now so I know it is not seized.

Will try a compression rest later then a try at starting it. Seems to be an antique engine, I plan on repainting/restoring the boat, trailer and do necessary repair to the engine.



 
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05-19-05, 04:38 PM   #3  
Johnson 40 HP

I'll have to look for the instructions. The previous owner said to mix it 50:1. I want to be sure I'm doing it right. Thanks.

Sherm

 
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05-19-05, 04:48 PM   #4  
Found Them

I found the instruction plate, I hope the previous owner made a mistake when he said 50:1 because 24:1 is correct. It also talks about Type B fluid in the gearbox. How do I check/change the gear fluid, and what is type B?

Is it possible to get a book for this engine?

Thanks,

Sherm

 
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05-19-05, 05:23 PM   #5  
Lower Unit 1963 40 hp Johnson Lark IV - Selectric Shift

The compression test I have just done shows 90 psi on #1 (top cylinder), and 85 psi on bottom. Someone in another response said 80 psi was OK, so I am sure I will have reasonable power, and will not do a rebuild for a hobby/ fishing motor..

A compression test will reveal any excessive ring/cylinder wear if oil/fuel mix was inadequate on yours. I used that cheap compression tester you can buy for $15 that you hold firmly into the spark plug hole whilst someone else cranks the ting. Had it 25 years and always accurate.

Also possible that rod bearings/crankshaft journal wear will cause a chattering sound when the motor is revved up. That indicates bearing/journal failure and likely involves a major overhaul or powerhead replacement.

Drain:
Remove both upper (vent) and lower (Drain/refill) slotted screws in the lower unit on the left side when facing the rear of the engine. This will allow all gear lube and water to drain.

Fill:
Insert the gear lube container spout in the lower hole (tightly) and squeeze in 'lower unit' gear oil until it begins to overflow at the vent hole .
Quickly reinsert the lower plug (and New Gasket) and tighten. Squeeze in a little more at the top until it overflows to ensure it is topped up.


Oil Type:
I do not know what Type 'B' references - probably specifically designed for outboard engines.
An OMC container of oil is in my boat and states it is reccommended for electric-shift gearcases.
The DIN number on the container is 45401901457
The product name is "Premium Blend Gearcase Lube"

Manual:
http://www.marineengine.com/manuals/...rude.html#1300


I might add that since I live in a Cold winter climate, Drain the lower unit at the end of the season just in case it freezes and cracks that thin weak aluminum case!

I intend to stay within paddling distance of shore with my new toy.

Happy boating weekend...



Last edited by oldJoe; 05-19-05 at 09:47 PM. Reason: Add comment
 
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05-20-05, 07:06 AM   #6  
Attaching Hose to Engine

I've heard that a hose can be attached to outboards so they can be run out of the water for service, can this be done on this engine?

Is there an air filter to change on this engine?

Thanks,

Sherm

 
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05-20-05, 09:11 AM   #7  
Flush device

Page 2-13 of the Seloc manual has a picture of a flush attachment connected to the lower unit using a garden hose as a water source. The manual states this may be used to make LOW speed adjustments to the running engine. If revved to high rpm this type of motor could according to the manual 'run away'. The prop has to be in a body of water to allow higher rpm running (load on the engine). I expect you could obtain this flush attachment from a local OMC dealer or boat shop.

No air filter - open throat of the carb is visible when the engine cover is removed. Fuel filter would be an asset since there is only a fine wire mesh screen on the intake line in the tank. I only see a low speed adjusment on the carb. The bowl could have some sediment in it since the fuel line has no filter.

Speaking of the tank - to my my surprise iI found each tank is worth C$208.

Since there were three in my boat, I took the plates off each and reinstalled them with a new gasket I cut from flat cork material I bought in a packet gasket kit. I also used 'Form a Gasket' from a tube when reinstalling.

Then I sanded smooth, primed and spray bombed them with a Rustoleum
type paint product. I was going to throw 2 of them away!

Results are almost like new.

Contemplating obtaining Evinrude decals for the tanks from
http://www.americanoutboard.com/deca...r_evinrude.htm

I bet your motor runs fine. Do not forget 2 new plugs as spares together with a proper wrench (crescent will do) in case the the ting quits, due to fouling.

Water in the tank can be concern. I've never removed water from a tank but I understand you remove the line at the engine the insert a sharp object to depress the ball and by squeezing the primer bulb you eventually clear the tank and line, since the water is on the bottom of the tank.

Perhaps someone could verify this.


 
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05-21-05, 02:00 PM   #8  
2 Stroke Oil

I need 30 wt oil to mix for an outboard motor. Can I buy plain oil, or is there a marine oil I need to buy? Thanks.

Sherm

 
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05-21-05, 04:13 PM   #9  
2 Stroke oil

The intended oil is a 'straight' wt oil - not a multiweight product such as 10x30. Available everywhere, particularly in stores that sell lawn tractors, which use it as a crankcase oil.

Maybe as well to use the marine 2 Cycle oil since it is designed for use in the 2 cycle engine. The practise of using 30 wt oil seems to predate the manufacture of 2 cycle oil.

As well, the 2-cycle oil has a blue dye. This makes it readily discernible that the fuel has already been mixed. Just have to ensure it is mixed at correct ratio when you do it.


Last edited by oldJoe; 05-21-05 at 04:19 PM. Reason: Afterthought
 
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05-21-05, 05:10 PM   #10  
Dont screw up the motor. Get the marine oil in a can . That way you know you put in the right amount.

ED

 
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05-21-05, 05:39 PM   #11  
Flush/Cool device

I just bought a flush device one from a NAPA outlet, and I would not use it on a 40 hp Johnson. Do not think it to be the correct type - looks like a pair of earmuffs!

Instead I will buy a Rubbermaid tote, that is at least 24" long to slip under the skeg and surround the lower unit to a height sufficient to immerse the whole thing ( about 18" deep) . I expect I could let the hose run slowly in the tank so water is always cool. No uncertainty with a tank I suppose.

 
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