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winterizing questions:)


William521's Avatar
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10-11-05, 06:24 PM   #1  
William521
winterizing questions:)

I have some questions regarding winterizing my stern drive boat if you could help me out some. The instructions say to remove drain plugs (port and stbd) from cylinder block and to remove drain plugs (port and stbd) from bottom of exhaust manifolds. This makes 4 plugs. Are 2 on one side and the other 2 on the other side in a simmetrical fashion?

The instructions recommend to place antifreeze in the seawater section of the cooling system for cold weather storage. I have freezing weather but how do I get the antifreeze/water blend inside of the seawater section?

Lastly they also say for additional assurance against freezing and rust to remove the thermostat cover and thermostat and pour in a mixture of antifreeze and tap water. Do seawater (raw-water) cooled models have this thermostate? If they do then where would it be located on my boat. Thanks alot for the excellent help

 
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thezster's Avatar
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10-11-05, 09:11 PM   #2  
Posted By: William521 I have some questions regarding winterizing my stern drive boat if you could help me out some. The instructions say to remove drain plugs (port and stbd) from cylinder block and to remove drain plugs (port and stbd) from bottom of exhaust manifolds. This makes 4 plugs. Are 2 on one side and the other 2 on the other side in a simmetrical fashion?

The instructions recommend to place antifreeze in the seawater section of the cooling system for cold weather storage. I have freezing weather but how do I get the antifreeze/water blend inside of the seawater section?

Lastly they also say for additional assurance against freezing and rust to remove the thermostat cover and thermostat and pour in a mixture of antifreeze and tap water. Do seawater (raw-water) cooled models have this thermostate? If they do then where would it be located on my boat. Thanks alot for the excellent help
First and foremost - do this with the boat on a trailer, not in the water....

The drain plugs in the manifolds should be in the front or rear of the manifolds - one end will have a hose running into it, the other end should have the plug.

The drain plugs for the block should be just above the oil pan. A V-8 will have one on each side, not sure if a straight 6 will have two or just one (never owned one).

You can disconnect the inlet hose to the cooling system (closed loop systems), and pour your anti freeze there.

Your boat does have a thermostat - usually on top and in the front of the engine. There should be a hose running into it from the water pump.

Personally, I don't mess with the anti-freeze portion of the process. I disconnect all my hoses at a point lower than the block and drain them before hooking them back up (don't forget to hook em back up.... or you'll sink your boat in the springtime).

I would suggest, before doing any of this, that you put gasoline stabilizer in the gas tank and run the engine for at least 15 minutes. this will get stabilizer into the carburator and fuel system. Also... before you button up the entire job, remove the spark plugs, spray oil or wd-40 into each cylinder and turn the engine over a few times to spread the lube over the cylinder walls - preventing rust and freeze up. A spritz of wd-40 in the distributor cap is also a good idea.


Goodness.... I just realized there is an excellent "winterizing post" at the top of this forum... that goes into much more detail than I do..... Take a look at it..... Good info!

 
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10-13-05, 05:26 AM   #3  
If I was in your shoes I would take my boat to a mechanic to have it winterized. It sounds like you're not sure of the process. If u make a mistake, it can cost u thousands in repairs. I'm talking cracked block, manifolds, etc. Winterizing a boat for winter lay over is not something to mess around with if you're not sure how to do it correctly.

 
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11-08-05, 04:17 AM   #4  
Hello: William

Follow the instructions of the manufacturer exactly.

The link below should help:
http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=146226

Regards, Good Luck & Safe Boating.
Sharp Advice. Boating Enthusiast. Web Sites Host, Forums Monitor, Moderator Hiring Agent & Multiple Topics Moderator.

 
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03-27-06, 02:00 PM   #5  
danw
Is winterizing required each year in "warmer" climate?

I live in the central valley of California, we sometimes dip into the mid-upper 30's at our coldest during the winter. I keep my boat outside, but covered. I've been having it winterized through my local dealer, but after reading a few posts here on winterizing, I'm now wondering if it's really necessary? Seems that the major concern is cold temperatures, is this right? I have a buddy round the corner with a bayliner that never winterizes his. Your two cents? :nfunny:

 
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03-27-06, 02:26 PM   #6  
Proper winterizing is more than just freeze prevention. It also prevents rust from parts sitting idle, conditions the fuel system, and provides a thorough check out of basic mechanical parts. It's more of a yearly preventive maintenance program....

 
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03-27-06, 02:31 PM   #7  
danw
Posted By: thezster Proper winterizing is more than just freeze prevention. It also prevents rust from parts sitting idle, conditions the fuel system, and provides a thorough check out of basic mechanical parts. It's more of a yearly preventive maintenance program....
Thanks for your reply. What if I were to go out say once a month and start it up (with water on of course, it's an I/O)? Keep some Stabil in the fuel and fire it up, might that keep it from rusting up or siezing? I'm just thinking out loud here, trying to save some $. But I don't want to cost myself a whole new engine or anything by being stupid/cheap!!

 
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03-27-06, 03:41 PM   #8  
I winterize my engine, regardless of where I live.... I do it myself and spend probably no more than $20 to do so.

Running the engine once a month is better than nothing... but the $$ and time you spend driving to the lake, unloading/loading, etc., is more trouble than winterizing, in my humble opinion.... Even so, you'll want to change the lower unit fluid, check the water impeller, spritz the ignition system/starting system with some WD-40, change the engine oil - etc. - every year anyway.

 
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03-28-06, 10:03 AM   #9  
danw
So true, it's probably no more hassle than all you mention, I need to get me a service manual and see what I can do myself. Thanks for all the replies!

 
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