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Transom repair


wayne tasker's Avatar
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Join Date: Feb 2007
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02-01-07, 03:19 PM   #1  
Transom repair

I have a V18 Bertram that's given trouble free service for 19 years and I'm in the process of giving it a full refurbishment. After lifting off the outboard I noticed that the top of the transom has delaminated in one section for a length of about 18'' and 3'' deep. Whats the best way to repair it and the best product for the job? Bear in mind the space to be filled cannot be cleaned of oil and dirt or other contaminants. Your expertise would be very much appreciated. Regards wayne.

 
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rebel's Avatar
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02-01-07, 03:45 PM   #2  
Couple of ways.

You did not comment on the condition of the remaining transom. However, there are two methods: (1) Since you state that there is gunk that cannot be cleaned, you could procure two stainless steel plates large enough to cover the damaged area with as much overlap extending out to the "good" area of the transom a possible and through bolt plates to transom, one each side. I would suggest 5/16" minimum plate thickness as well as 1/4" minimum bolts. Thicker is better. OR

(2) Clean the damaged area completely with solvents, sand the area aggressively with 80 grit and 30 grit sand paper, again, sanding to overlap onto "good" transom area as much as possible. If you are going to gel coat the repaired area, use polyester resin and glas cloth, "layer" fill the area to the original surface. If you do not plan to gel coat the repaired area use high strength two part epoxy and glas to repair the area and paint same.

Good luck.

Rebel

 
Ed Imeduc's Avatar
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02-01-07, 03:58 PM   #3  
Hard to say when you dont see it. I have taken out the bad wood rebuild it and glass over it all. Then have put a light angle across the whole transom inside the boat. Also Have made a wide U channel like. To slip over it all out of S/S or aluminum. One short leg to fit in the boat the other leg going almost down to the bottom of the transom out side of the boat. Then there is the gill bracket you can put on the back of the transom. Thats if the rest of the transom is good

 
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02-08-07, 10:04 AM   #4  
Look here

Posted By: wayne tasker I have a V18 Bertram that's given trouble free service for 19 years and I'm in the process of giving it a full refurbishment. After lifting off the outboard I noticed that the top of the transom has delaminated in one section for a length of about 18'' and 3'' deep. Whats the best way to repair it and the best product for the job? Bear in mind the space to be filled cannot be cleaned of oil and dirt or other contaminants. Your expertise would be very much appreciated. Regards wayne.
Wayne,

I have seen folks use this a product called Seacast to replace old wood transom's you might want to check it out. Go to www.transomrepair.com a little rot goes a long ways, it might be worse than it looks on the outside. Good luck

jim

 
smartbomb's Avatar
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02-09-07, 03:24 AM   #5  
do you have delaminated fiberglass or delaminated plywood? I'm going to guess it's the fiberglass. You should really clean and remove all the delaminated portion and re-glass the transom to get the maximum strength. Keep in mind that it delaminated for a reason - probably the stress and vibration from your outboard.

If that's not realistic, a simpler more temporary fix could be to beef it up with a couple of layers of MG Ply, which you could paint and through-bolt with stainless steel hardware and some silicone sealant. The mg ply can be painted first or even glassed if you want but it should be protected from the environment somehow.

 
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03-16-07, 08:03 PM   #6  
Lots of superb advise here. I'll add my own experience if I may.

I wound up with an early 60s Crackerbox - rotted waterline removed for replacement. Battens, keel, some of stem layers were all replaced. The breasthook was mostly rotted out, and that's something that cannot be replaced, no matter how many tricks you have up your sleeve.

I did sorts of things for removal of rotted material - scraping out the rotted material with a chisel until gone. For much of the case, this left leaving only the fiberglass skin shell, intended for protection, not structural integrity - fair enough.

How to rebuild - The idea was to take thin veneers and roughly shape layer pieces to fit what I needed at each layer. Later after layer of veneers bonded with the good stuff - West systems marine epoxy.

Once you have things built up enough, it's time for the belt sander. Start hogging the rough shape of epoxied fernier close to the proper shape. Pot any rough voids with WSM Epoxy mixed with microbaloons (See why I love the stuff?) for final shaping.

By now you're ready for a sanding tool slightly more delicate control than a belt sander/grinder for the final shaping. What you wind up with is a layered/potted breasthook that has held up 100% for my Crackerbox over the years.

Having said all that, it would be nice if DoItYourself.com would stop being so greedy - take, take and take. They love the free content we all provide, they love for us to link to them, and bookmark them, but you're totally douched the favor of a link back to your website for taking the time and effort to post - in my case, the site that discusses the above work in great detail -

http://hares.net/boat

Sorry I couldn't include a real link in my signature....

 
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