OMC carb to fuel inj

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  #1  
Old 07-12-07, 05:39 PM
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OMC carb to fuel inj

I have a 1995 four winns horzion bowrider. It has a omc 5.0 carb motor.
Does anybody know for sure if you can change from carb to fuel inj. without going more than what the boat is worth. Could it be done using auto fuel inj. anybody with sound advise please advise

thanks jmw
 
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  #2  
Old 07-12-07, 07:44 PM
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Donít even consider it. The carb version of is a fairly simple mechanically controlled engine. The carb delivers the fuel based on engine vacuum and the ignition advance is controlled by the mechanical advance in the distributor. The fuel injected engine is computer controlled. The control computer senses various inputs like coolant temp, throttle position, mass airflow, crank position etc, and delivers the appropriate fuel and ignition advance.

You would need to replace the intake manifold, add a throttle body fuel injector, add a fuel vapor recovery assembly, engine control module, and a whole bunch of wiring harnesses and sensors. A 1995 5.0 OMC is a GM based engine and although the automotive components may look similar they are not even close in terms of functionality.

Stick with the carb. When properly adjusted and tuned the 5.0 is a very good marine engine, smooth and strong.
 
  #3  
Old 07-13-07, 04:25 AM
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There are specialty marine conversion kits available for older engines like yours. Most of the parts are relatively "bolt on", so to speak and are included in the kit. The biggest "boat modification" is a return line from your engine to your fuel tank. Not to say there isn't a lot involved, from the new throttle body assembly, to the remote ECM, high pressure fuel pump, regulator, fuel rails, etc. However, if you're willing to spend the approximately $2000 - $2500 for the parts - and the time to do the conversion, it can be well worth it in terms of performance and reliability. Will it be worth it in terms of resale value - questionable...

An automotive conversion kit is similar but there are, in fact differences - a marine system is, or should be, designed for the conditions experienced in the marine environment - they are made of water resistent materials and design. As mentioned above, that GM small block you're running is essentially an automobile engine, but has special gaskets/cooling system, parts, that differentiate it from the one in your car.
 
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