Transom saver & other ?'s

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  #1  
Old 07-14-07, 10:19 AM
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Smile Transom saver & other ?'s

Hello! Newbie here so many questions. I traded an old pontoon boat for a 1985 18 ft Bayliner Capri bowrider 185/1850? w/125 Force outboard. When trailering should I have the motor tilted down? It has a CMC PT 130 power TNT. It seems to be putting a lot of stress on the transom. I read some where that one could use a 2 X 10 board and tilt the motor down to tighten it up. What about those rubber wedges? I would need something the would go against the transom itself because no bar on trailer if I need any thing at all. I am afraid that the motor and tilt might just break off one day while driving down the road because the fiberglass isn't that great with cracks in other places. The weight of it all seems to be causing some gapping between TNT bracket and transom. Also does anyone know if this model came with a bimini? Any recommendations on economical tops? Also any info on a book or site that talks about redoing the deck? As of right now it is like walking on a sponge but, it will get me by this season. Also, is the use of a hydrofoil/Stingray recommended? Any ideas on an easy way to make some cover supports to keep the rain from puddling? I am using poles right now with limited success. I know this is a lot, so thanks in advance!
 
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  #2  
Old 07-14-07, 01:43 PM
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For starters - your outboard should be either in the down position if road clearance allows while trailering - or held in the up position to relieve the stress on the tilt mechanism. Using a 2X10 can get you some angle to raise the unit - but beware - when the engine bounces while towing (and it will), that piece of 2X10 can fall - creating a serious hazard for following motorists. There is nothing that says you can't rig up something - just try to make sure it will remain securely in place.

Possible bad news - Bayliner can be credited with putting more folks "on the water" than possibly any other boat manufacturer - it's because they're inexpensive - and that means possibly not quite as well built/long lasting as other brands. A 20 yr old boat of any make/model is very prone to transom damage/wear - and should be inspected annually for cracks/looseness/rot. Towing your boat with the engine unsupported in the up position will exacerbate that potential damage.

Bimini tops can be purchased from any mail order catalogue (Overtons/West Marine) in a wide range of sizes/types/materials. They are typically very adjustable and easily installed.

Whether or not you use a foil depends on how happy you are with the boats performance. If it works for your needs, why bother? A foil will provide better hole shot/acceleration - and help you get up on plane a bit faster. Top speed is not affected much.

Redoing the deck?? Exactly what portion are you talking about?

Cover supports? I assume that means you have a cover that sags in the middle when it rains.... I've used pieces of PVC running from side to side, braced against the floor/wall in the past. They're cheap, flexible, and easy to cut to size. Not the perfect solution, to be sure, but I'm guessing you want the most inexpensive solution possible for now. You can also purchase proper tensioners from the above mentioned catalogues.....
 
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Old 07-14-07, 01:55 PM
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Z thanks much for all the info! As far as the deck goes I need to redo the whole thing as it is one BIG sponge. Pull seats and all, then tear the bottom out. I read some where that a guy used 3/4" plastic instead of marine grade wood. That sounds kind of interesting. Also read how one could use PT wood and then put resin coat on it. I have no idea how to do it but, that also seems to be when I tend to learn something. Would like to know a little at least because if my fixing mowers is any indication, it will cost me at least twice as much than it should! Thanks again.
 
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Old 07-14-07, 02:06 PM
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You're talking about the floor, right?

You're planning on a major job to do that properly. A floor is a structural portion of most boats made today (and 1985) - so the first thing to do is to ensure you have the boat on a solid supportive surface so it won't sag when you cut the old floor out. Obviously, you'll have to remove all the seats/carpets/etc, before starting. Then you'll have to cut out the old floor, being careful not to cut too deep into the bottom of the boat. Once you get the floor out, you'll have to inspect the stringers for damage also (those are very, very difficult to replace properly). Once you've assessed the situation, it's not a difficult job to cut new flooring to the proper shape and (hopefully you, or someone you know, have some glassing experience) then glassing it into the bottom of the boat. Plywood is the product of choice - though I used plastic sheeting on my last boat (very spendy, but will last a lifetime - classic boat). Exterior grade will typically do you fine - marine grade simply isn't worth the effort/expense for flooring. Once it's installed, you glass over the new flooring and then put down new carpet. Simple, huh??
 
  #5  
Old 07-15-07, 07:08 AM
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LOL!!! I better hook up that wood stove so I can have heat in the garage because this sounds like it will take all winter to do it right! I appreciate all the info. Initially tearing out the old floor will be easy so then I should be able to see what I am dealing with as far as depth of cut/stringers/supports, etc. At the back feels like there is a hole so, I will start there after seat and carpet removal. You have given me an idea what I am up against if I decide to take this on. Thanks again!
 
  #6  
Old 07-15-07, 08:10 AM
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I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but what you have there is a TON of work.

First I'll say DO NOT put a fin on a Force O/B. The plate you have to bolt it to is too thin and will probably break off. (I can show you pictures of one that I used to have.)

The worst part about your boat is that the transom and floor are rotten. That means that the stringers and bulkheads up to the front of the seats are probably compromised also. If you plan to go ahead with this project, please do a lot of research. Don't fix the transom and the floors at the same time. You will loose too much support.

Do a search for "Bayliners Owners Club". You will get a lot of info and support there. Also go to BoaterED.com for help, and BoatFix.com for parts and materials.

Best of luck to you. If you are married I hope you have an understanding wife, or one who likes to help with these type projects. I have started 3 of these major projects and only finished one. You could save yourself a lot of time, money and tears if you just part that boat out on ebay, the roll around naked in some fiberglass dust, slam your hands in a car door 6-8 times, jump off the roof and land on your knees, and then go buy a boat less than 6 years old that has been kept inside and the owner has not drilled any holes in the floor or the transom. Oh yeah, and get it professionally surveyed before you buy it.

Anyone who has been through this know that I am not being a jerk, but just trying to help.
 
  #7  
Old 07-17-07, 12:54 PM
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LOL!!!!!!!!
Ok Dan,
I hear ya as it will be a major job. What about taking the Force and putting it on an 18 foot pontoon? Would like to have a deck boat feel that can still act as a ski boat with minimum headache and $. Thanks!
 
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