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Installing a stereo in my boat


black95gt's Avatar
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05-18-09, 12:12 PM   #1  
Installing a stereo in my boat

I have a 95' Procraft Bass boat that i am getting ready to install a CD player with 2 speakers and maybe 4. The speakers are Marine speakers and the deck is just a normal JVC deck. I am installing the Deck on the Port side and i have the option to either run the power back to my dual trolling motor battery setup, or i can take it to the starting battery, bu ti havent decided yet. Connecting the speakers and the power to the deck will be fairly easy for me. But here are my questions:

Do i need to, or should I connect it to the Master auxillary switch? Im guessing no, cuz i usually do not have this on while fishing or floating but would want the radio on obviously. And if i dont tie into the master switch, am i running the power straight to the battery? and if so, with the deck shut off, will this continue to drain the battery? Where do i ground the deck out at? since im not using an amp, do i just let the blue wire hang free? Thanks

 
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05-18-09, 02:36 PM   #2  
You shoudl definately connect it to the trolling battery (I presume the starter is shallow cycle).

Easiest thing to do is to just run two cables to the battery, and not bother with grounding it to the deck. Usualy the systems will have a complete on off switch on them, failing which just use a switch on the negative side (yes negative, to stop sparks in the switch)

 
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05-18-09, 04:59 PM   #3  
Not trying to stir anything up but you will want to use a marine radio. they are made to take the abuse of the pounding waves and will handle the moisture as well. I have seen this many times it's just not worth spending money on a regular radio and then replacing it with a marine radio.

As for the power you are better off taking power from the fuse box for the main power in. You can take power from the batt for the memory it will draw about 1/4 -1/2 amp and will drain the batt minimally. There should be a ground at or by the fuse box as well. The deep cycle batts should not have any electronics hooked to them weather it be graphs or radios.
Again I'm not trying to step on toes just been there done that and learned from it.Beer 4U2

 
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05-19-09, 07:31 AM   #4  
Thanks for your replys. Samauri, i already have bought the deck. Its nothing expensive and came out of another boat. I have never had a marine deck in my boats and have never had a problem, but i hear where your coming from. Im not sure if i will be able to run it to the fuse box without tearing the boat apart or having exposed wires. there just isnt any way for me to run the wires that i can think of.

Bloomfield, the starter battery is a big marine battery. I beleive it is a deep cycle, but dont know for sure. I know its the same battery i had in my other boat that i had hardcore system ran to. The only thing i dont know about off hand is if the trolling motor setup is 24 volt or not. I have two batteries connected together with an onboard charger, so im guessing that if i connect to one of the post, it would be drawing 12 volts from the other battery as well. So i dont know if that would be an option now.

 
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05-19-09, 05:33 PM   #5  
I'm going to have to step on some toes here, because connecting to the master aux switch or the fuse panel has the potential to drain the main starting battery. Bad idea that will leave you stranded on the water!

If the JVC is a self-contained stereo with built-in amplifiers (in other words, you're not using additional amplifiers), connect it to the trolling motor batts. That way if you decide to relax & drift for a few hours after fishing you won't drain the starting battery.

The easiest way to determine whether the trolling motor's two-battery system is 12 or 24 volts is to look at the terminal wiring on the batts. If the two batts are connected together by two jumpers -- one that goes from positive to positive, and another that goes from negative to negative -- it's a 12-volt system. In this case, connect your stereo to either battery.

A 24-volt system will have a single jumper between the positive of one batt and the negative of the other. In this case, connect your stereo to the positive and negative of only one of the two batts. It doesn't matter which one. The problem here is that one of the two 12 + 12 = 24v batts will drain unevenly.

How are you charging the batteries?

 
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05-20-09, 05:59 PM   #6  
No problem Rick I see your point but you can get interferance from the trolling motor. Also if the radio only draws say 5 amps it would need to be on all day to drain the batt. Look at some guys running up to 6 graphs, although they are usually tournement fishing and not in one spot all day. All the manufacturers are wired to the starting batt through the fuse panel, I have never seen one on the trolling motor batt. I have talked to lowrance about this and they say never use the deep cycle batts for a graph.

I have a large amplifier in one of my boats, when I'm tied up with the radio on I watch my gauge on my graph and will start the motor and let it run for a while every couple hours.

Again I'm not trying to start anything but a good debate never hurts.Beer 4U2

 
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05-21-09, 05:11 AM   #7  
Okay ... I'm removing my steel-toed shoes. A good debate can help us all learn something.

To that end, please help me understand Lowrance's position on deep cycle batts. I know it's asking a lot, but can you call or e-mail them to ask specifically why they don't recommend it? There's nothing about it in my Lowrance GPS manual.

An electronic or electrical device doesn't receive power from a battery -- it draws power from a battery. That's why we can use an 80-amp battery to power a device that uses only 1 amp. Or, for that matter, a computer that draws 200 watts on a household AC circuit capable of supplying 1800 watts.

Interference in a marine or automotive electrical system is usually caused by spark plugs or ignition. It will show up in radios as a clicking sound or whine that changes with the speed of the motor. A trolling motor can also generate similar noise on the power line. Chart plotters and depth finders use transducers, which can also pick up this interference.

One recommended way to avoid interference is to connect electronic devices directly to the battery rather than to the aux or accessory terminal of the ignition switch. Another is to install a noise suppression filter on the power leads to the radio or electronic device.

In larger cruisers it's not uncommon to see several banks of batteries under the deck. My brother's 34-footer w/twin screws has two starting batts and four aux batts. They are isolated in pairs and charged by either engine, or by shore power on a three-stage charger/supply. His sound system has three high-power amplifiers fed directly off a pair of aux batts with 6-gauge cables. No interference at all.

My Larson has three batts. One starter and two deep cycles for aux. Everything that's not required for starting the engine is isolated on the aux batteries. (Tied to a common ground, of course.) Never had an issue.

The aux batts have an 8-gauge to the console, where a terminal strip branches through two fuse/switch panels to the systems, including my 300-watt stereo amp.

When on shore power, the batts are charged individually via a three-stage charger.

 
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05-21-09, 06:14 PM   #8  
Great info, I will try and get something from lowrance. I have been to a couple update seminars held by the field reps and was told by them both times.

I have not seen a radio hooked to deep cycle batts, I will try it next time I get the chance and see what happens.

I probubly shouldn't have brought this up not knowing all my facts. I will get my ducks in a row and get back to you on this

 
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05-22-09, 07:50 PM   #9  
Ok Rick I'm wrong and will go stand in the corner with the dunce cap on. I called lowrance tech line today and was told they suggest not using the same batt as the trolling motor but it should be fine.

So Blackgt if you haven't been anoyed too much by me trying to make my wrong point you should be fine using the deep cycle batt.

 
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05-26-09, 12:47 PM   #10  
yeah, you guys went way up and beyond my knowledge lol...im rethinking what i am going to do. Ive read that i can install my speakers and buy a little amp and plug an IPOD or MP3 player into the Amp and skip using the deck. Im still looking into this. It makes better sense in my case to use my ipod over a deck as i dont have CDS. Anybody heard of this being done?

 
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05-26-09, 04:36 PM   #11  
Thats what I have in my race boat. I set up a bag with everything in it and use the cigaret lighter to power the amp. Its nice to be able to take it out of the boat when I don't use it.

 
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06-05-09, 11:25 AM   #12  
A little late in posting here:

Do you listen to the radio at all? It would be awefully convinient to have a radio with an aux in. This way, if you ever have a cd you can listen to that, but most times you can just plug your ipod into the aux in, and if you feel like listening to the radio you could do so as well.

I would also suggest getting a record player and see how that goes

 
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06-05-09, 08:50 PM   #13  
What is a record player?

 
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