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Boat w/Merc parked for 7yrs..


DaveC72's Avatar
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06-20-09, 06:26 PM   #1  
Boat w/Merc parked for 7yrs..

I have a '77 (or maybe it was '79) Merc 50 '500' 4cyl engine thats been sitting on a parked boat for 7 years now.

I was always in the habit of seasonal storage.. would flush the grease in the bottom end, lube everything in the manual, fog the engine and use stabilizer (I like to leave the fuel in for winter storage). Then I would spray down the whole engine with a storage spray like LPS-3. Its long ago now, but Im pretty sure I did this after we used it last (I sure hope so anyhow..)

This seemed to work good for years. Until 7 years ago when we suddenly built a house and then had 2 children. So there the boat sat.. the cover rotted off and was replaced with plywood and tarps.. the tarps rotted off, then the plywood.. Last summer I cleaned it out a bit and found that the floor was rotted (it was getting shaky anyhow, pre-storage).. so we built a covered hut kinda thing for it. Was nice to see no snow in it last winter ! Now its sheltered from rain and most of the sunshine.

Clearly, Im gonna have to rip out the flooring and the floatation foam.. maybe the controls etc.. who knows. The big ticket item I guess is the engine. How much damage could I have done to the engine by not running it at least with muffs during this time. Should I be looking for a minimum of pull the bottom end and do the impeller.. and then get 2 full carb kits for a redo of them ? Are there different 'levels' of carb rebuild kits for it ?

Any other engine related things I should be looking to buy ?

Not sure what else might be damaged from 7 winters of -40 and 7 summers of +90.

Im hoping to assemble the parts needed (gonna online order I think.. local prices are pretty steep here), and get the boat into my garage this winter. At least, thats the plan.. lol

Im gonna have to join BAA (Boat Abusers Anon.)

 
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samuari's Avatar
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06-20-09, 08:11 PM   #2  
I would start with a compression test just to be shure no rust has developed in the cylinders. Then as you said a impeller and carb kits, there is just one kit from mercury with jets neadle and I think maybe a float. Check for spark as well.


Last edited by samuari; 06-21-09 at 10:13 AM.
 
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06-20-09, 09:59 PM   #3  
Posted By: samuari you have made the hardest step admiting you have a problem.
I assume you're referring to the 'suddenly built a house and had 2 kids" ?

Compression test is a good idea. Its so dry though, should I even consider the results of a dry comp test, or just skip to oiling the cyl. Come to think of it.. thats a 2-stroke.. Ive never comp tested a 2 stroke. Do you still oil the cyl like with a auto engine ? I have a gauge and probably the right port size.. what sort of psi should I be looking for. This will probably be with a pull rope.. a 50 isnt too bad to pull.

Thx for info.

 
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06-21-09, 06:31 AM   #4  
My brother has several ancient outboards he's found around town that had been sitting for years. A '56 Merc, a '62 Evinrude, an early 70's Evinrude to name a few. All of them run like tops because the owners had winterized them properly before their boats were abandoned or forgotten. As I recall, he did have to rebuild the carbs and replace the impellors.

On your boat I would also pay close attention to the gas line & primer. The shift, steering & throttle cables should also get a good look-see.

Flooring and other plywood on an old boat is routine maintenance. Try to keep the old wood intact when you remove it so you can use it as a template. Use an exterior-grade plywood and paint it with polyesther or epoxy resin after you've cut it, dry-fit it, and drilled screw holes.

Why do you need to replace the floatation? If it's intact it should be okay.

 
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06-21-09, 07:32 AM   #5  
Thanks for the tip of using exterior plywood w/epoxy paint.. gonna keep that in mind.. I had thought I was gonna used 'marine grade' plywood, the price of which is shocking.. lol

About 12 yrs ago, I installed some pedistal seats in it to replace the oem ones. When I hole-drilled the flooring and into the foam, the foam came up like sponge soaked in water.. really heavy and wet. The boat is a Springbok 18ft deepV aluminum from the same era as the motor ('77/'79).. Im not sure what they used for floatation foam and if its supposed to last forever ?

 
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06-21-09, 10:12 AM   #6  
Dave, I didn't anything about that computers and grammer isn't my strong point.

I see this often but I have haven't delt with the older mercs. What I would do is just a quick checkover on the motor just pull the plugs and check to see spark, and as long as they are out just hook up the compression tester to see that it has compression. If it has close to 100 it should be fine. Like Rick said Look at the controls and fuel system to make shure they are up to par.

If it passes it should run after a carb clean and a impeller. I have found a product called "engine tuner" works great for cleaning the carbs you can see it eating the varnish then after sitting for 20 min. spray it all off with a regular carb cleaner to rinse. Ask for it when you get your parts they will know what you mean.


If the foam is wet under the floor I would replace it but if it's dry it should stay. The foam is for flotation so that if the boat was to get swamped it will not sink to the bottom, it will stay clost to the top.

 
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