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Transome repair


JOHNNY BE GOOD's Avatar
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10-22-09, 06:09 AM   #1  
Transome repair

I have a 1987 Chapperal Mercury 350 i/o the transome is getting soft around the gimble mount and you can see the transome flex when shifting from foward to reverse. I poked around the inside around the gimble mount an it is soft. I was just wondering if there is an easy fix like loosening the mount and sliding in a aluminum or stainless plate or should I pull the motor and outdrive dig out the wood from inside and not disturbing the fiberglass on outside and glueing in and fiberglassing in a new peice of marine plywood. I am sure that my second option is probably better but just looking for some advice on where I can info on fiberglassing in the plywood. I really don't want to replace the boat I already have alot into it and I like it. Thanks for any help John Beer 4U2

 
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samuari's Avatar
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10-22-09, 06:47 PM   #2  
Well the plate will just be a patch and will not last if it works at all. You need to do it right and only once and pull the motor, outdrive , and transome assy. Once that is out remove all the ols transome from the inside and replace. It's a big job but it's also rewording once you are done. You will find there are multiple layers of plywood usually 3/4". I have never done a i/o transome but I have done 3 outboards.
Expect to spend at least 40 hours on it up to 80, and from $500-1000. It's also is a dirty itchy job. I'm not trying to scare you just give you a heads up.
I have used polyester resin in the past but my next one will be done in epoxy resin, it's a little more forgiving as far as serface prep.
The first one I did only lasted 2 years because I used the wrong materials and didn't have a clue what I was doing. Since then I progressed to a full transone core and floor on a boat I will be racing next year and hope to run it up to 90 mph. With that said I'm not a expert but I do trust my own work.
You can do it, just use good materials and take your time.

If you have any questions we are here to help!

 
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10-23-09, 07:33 AM   #3  
Thanks Samuari

Thank you for the reply this will be my winter project
I am very comfortable pulling the Merc. 350 engine
I have done it before to change the coupler and have worked a little with fiberglass .
What I was wondering is if I can strip everthing from inside wall cut about a 3 foot section of fiberglass out dig out all the rotted wood down to the inside of the outside fiberglass wall and not disturb the outside at all then laminate layers of plywood from inside to the inside of the outside wall of fiberglass then glass over the whole inside to tie it all together. This way I don't have to disturb the outside at all. Are there any sites out there showing how to laminate the layers of plywood together and what to use for adhesive and fiberglass materials? Do I use the fiberglass resin to glue the first peice of plywood to the inside of the fiberglass transom wall or glue each layer of plywood with a special glue and then glass it all over. Sorry alot of questions but its a big job and I want to do it right the first time. Thanks
John Beer 4U2

 
samuari's Avatar
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10-23-09, 08:28 PM   #4  
John I don't know of any fiberglass sites. You are correct as far as doing it from the inside there is a lot of strength in the outside fiberglass. You can use a polyester made for laminating not general purpose polyester. The GP resin has wax additive so the outside will harden, the laminating resin will remain tacky until it has the absence of air. With this you won't need to sand between coats as long as it stays clean and is layed up within 36 hours. I use gel coat with wax added as a final coat. Make sure to use marine grade plywood Green treated wood is the worst thing you can use as the chemicals will slowly come out of the wood and cause the resin to lift from the wood.

Once you get into it you will find 2 or 3 layers of plywood, if you only do the center section make sure to cut the layers larger as you go away from the outside by at least 3". So your first layer agenst the outside is say 36" the next sheet should be 42". This will make a lot stronger repair.

I haven't done a IO so you will need to come up with some way to clamp the wood in place.

 
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10-24-09, 06:11 AM   #5  
Thanks again

Thanks again Samauri I am taking my boat out of the Monongahela river in Pa. on Sunday 10/24 and then my winter project gets started. Have a good one and thanks for the advice. I will keep checking back to see if anyone can lead me to a fiberglass repair site John Beer 4U2

 
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