restore sunken outboard

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  #1  
Old 04-19-10, 07:48 PM
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restore sunken outboard

About three weeks ago my brother-in-law's boat sank at the dock after a several nights of extremely heavy rain (a corroded bilge pump wire which prevented it from working). Anyway, the next day it was floated up, and now he's finally getting around to thinking about trying to get the outboard engine running again. Short of an entire engine teartown and rebuild, what kind of work on the engine would generally be expected to have to be done to restore it to running again? Boat went down in salt water. Is there a decent chance he can get it going again? Or probably not? He does apparently have some guy that works on boat engines all the time to help him. I need to know because they're planning on parking it in my driveway until they can "get it fixed."
 
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Old 04-19-10, 09:24 PM
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They should have hosed down everything including the electrical system with fresh water and then let it dry, possibly blowing warm air over it to hasten drying.
Since the engine was not running, it reduces the chance of damage to the internal parts, but I would still pull the plugs to be sure there was no water in the cylinders and then squirt some water displacing oil into them. The carb will probably need rebuilding and some of the ignition components may need replacing, but with a little luck, the engine may live without major surgery.
 
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Old 04-20-10, 04:28 AM
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There's a very good chance they can get it running in a day or two, but if there's a problem it could take weeks this time of year to get parts. (It's the busy season!)

Make sure they drain the lubricants out of the engine (oil reservoir, if equipped, and lower unit) and replace them. Tell them not to connect the battery and crank it until they are sure that all the water is out of the engine.

For the record: Many mechanics recommend leaving the engine submerged in fresh water until it can be checked. Corrosion happens faster when there's air involved.
 
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Old 04-20-10, 08:18 AM
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Originally Posted by goldstar View Post
They should have hosed down everything including the electrical system with fresh water and then let it dry, possibly blowing warm air over it to hasten drying. Since the engine was not running, it reduces the chance of damage to the internal parts, but I would still pull the plugs to be sure there was no water in the cylinders and then squirt some water displacing oil into them. The carb will probably need rebuilding and some of the ignition components may need replacing, but with a little luck, the engine may live without major surgery.
Goldstar perhaps you could elaborate please. I would assume he didn't hose everything down and let it dry as you mention. If that's the case should he still do that, or not bother since it wasn't done at the outset?
They will pull the plugs, but as far as determining whether there is any water in the cylinders, how is that actually done? Or do they just assume water got in there and go ahead and squirt in the water-displacing oil? And what's a good water-displacing oil to use? How much would they squirt in there?
And which ignition components will probably need replacing?
Thanks
 
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Old 04-20-10, 08:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Rick Johnston View Post
There's a very good chance they can get it running in a day or two, but if there's a problem it could take weeks this time of year to get parts.
Make sure they drain the lubricants out of the engine (oil reservoir, if equipped, and lower unit) and replace them. Tell them not to connect the battery and crank it until they are sure that all the water is out of the engine. For the record: Many mechanics recommend leaving the engine submerged in fresh water until it can be checked. Corrosion happens faster when there's air involved.
Rick they have two weeks max to work on this thing (in my driveway anyway!). If there's a problem, as you mention there might be, and they need parts, I guess they'll need to get 'em in two weeks. So if there is a problem, which we can assume there will be, what parts will they probably need? The most expensive ones? That would have been nice if he had known to keep the engine submerged in fresh water until he could check it, but he probably didn't. So in three weeks time is this corrosion you speak of going to prevent restoring it to running condition? Thanks

How will they know and be sure that all the water is out of the engine before they connect the battery and try to crank it?
 
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Old 04-20-10, 02:51 PM
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As Rick said, change the lube in the lower unit as well. Something like dry gas or Heet is a water dispersant but you probably don;t need it. Removing the plugs and squirting a little WD-40 in wouldn't hurt. When the engine is ready to crank, crank it a few times without the plugs, and then put the plugs in and see if it fires. Since it was not running when it sank, there should not be a hydrolock problem.
You said it was in salt water and that is why I suggested hosing it down. Even if it is now dry, humidity can cause the residual salt to cause corrosion, so cleaning it up would be a good idea.
 
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Old 04-20-10, 07:07 PM
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If it sat out of the water for 2 weeks and is just now being looked at I wouldn't have high hopes of it running again and IF it does I would bet it wont last long.
My reasoning is the water and now air has gotten into all the crank bearings, as well as the cylinders and most likely has started the rust process.
First thing to do is pull out a spark plug and look into the cyl and look for rust, if you see any stop there because there is some on the crank bearings.
If that looks good drain the carbs, and fuel tank remove the spark plugs, if the batt is still good use it to turn the motor over with the plugs out and spray a lot of wd-40 down the throughts of the carbs. This should get most of the water out. As long as your turning it over check for spark.

What make and model is it?
Eather way it's about a 50/50 chance of running again.
 
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Old 04-21-10, 02:27 PM
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It's a Yamaha 150 engine. So far from what I understand, my brother-in-law has been advised to pull the plugs and put diesel in the cylinders and let it sit for a 2-3 days then try to crank it manually apparently to tell if it's seized up or to loosen it if it is seized to some extent. So that's what he's done so far, in addition to draining the oil and gas.
Thanks for all the advice so far here, I'm attempting to pass it on to him and his "boat mechanic" buddy, but they seem to already know everything if you know what I mean.
 
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Old 04-21-10, 07:43 PM
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Sounds good, I don't want to burst any bubbles but also don't want to see another boater stick a bunch of time and money into something that may not be worth it.

If you need any help just let us know, good luck, keep your fingers crossed.
 
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Old 04-27-10, 06:09 AM
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How they making out on this motor?

Here sinking equipment in the drink is all too common but more so with snowmobiles. quads and now rhinos.
With the exception of some newer electronics, if the motor is torn down within a couple of hours of fishing out of the water there is often no problem getting things running again.
With the length of time your bil's motor sat I doubt it will ever run again.

The sad part would be if it did manage to run and he decided to sell it!
 
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Old 04-27-10, 08:16 AM
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Originally Posted by GregH View Post
How they making out on this motor?
They finally just yesterday made a first attempt at cranking the engine by hand to see if it would turn. Several days before they had squirt diesel into the cylinders via the spark plug holes and let it soak in there in to free the pistons in the case that maybe they were seized. They seemed happy and encouraged because they did get it to crank manually and smoothly. Then they pumped the diesel back out of the cylinders, and their next steps were to replace the electrical parts as well as the carburetor which they had managed to acquire cheaply from an identical salvage engine. But they let the diesel drip/splash out onto my driveway even after our agreement that they wouldn't be making a mess there if they were going to work on it there. So I yelled at them about it, and they got all upset and threw their tools back into the boat and hauled it away to work on it elsewhere. If I ever hear they got it running again I'll post back. Thanks
 
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Old 04-27-10, 11:27 AM
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Too bad, unfortunately you can't fire family!
 
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Old 04-28-10, 03:40 AM
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Originally Posted by GregH View Post

The sad part would be if it did manage to run and he decided to sell it!
sounds like my car i just got rid off.
 
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Old 04-30-10, 05:00 PM
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I'm assuming your next project will be to get the diesel out of your driveway. If so, get a bag of portland cement powder. It's the "glue" that holds sand & aggregate together to form concrete. Spread it out about 1/2" thick or more & leave it there several weeks & it'll pull the diesel oil out of the concrete, almost as if it never happened. Good luck
 
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Old 04-30-10, 09:47 PM
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Originally Posted by CNTRTOP View Post
I'm assuming your next project will be to get the diesel out of your driveway. If so, get a bag of portland cement powder. It's the "glue" that holds sand & aggregate together to form concrete. Spread it out about 1/2" thick or more & leave it there several weeks & it'll pull the diesel oil out of the concrete, almost as if it never happened.
Thanks CNTRTOP for that advice; however my driveway happens to be gravel, not concrete. I had just a week earlier purchased several pickup loads of nice-looking washed gravel and a good part of day spreading it around with a shovel and rake in the area where I park and get in and out of my vehicles. So I was rather upset that they didn't take any precaution not to drip their diesel on it, creating dark oily stains on the nice gray gravel, which I guess I'll have to replace now if I want it to look good again.
 
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