Perplexed with Battery

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  #1  
Old 06-04-17, 11:10 AM
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Perplexed with Battery

I have a 2000 Tracker Pro Deep V16 with 2 batteries. The trolling battery is ok, but last weekend the cranking battery would not charge. It measured at 0.6 volts so my onboard charger would not charge it (4 volt minimum). Thinking that a battery that low must have failed internally, I replaced it. The new battery came up to full charge in 3 hrs. Today that new battery is so low that it can't be charged. Could a current drain in my boat take a battery that low? It seems too great a coincidence that a new battery would fail in a week.

Edit: I may have found the problem. My livewell pump was on. The next question is how do I get the battery voltage high enough for an electronic charger to work? The instructions with a small charger that I have says to jump the battery to raise the voltage high enough. Is this safe. I envision a massive current flow from my trolling battery to the dead (0.24V) battery.
 

Last edited by Handyman663; 06-04-17 at 11:49 AM.
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  #2  
Old 06-04-17, 01:21 PM
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Just jump trolling battery over to start battery. will not have a massive transfer, Connect charger after battery's connected. Once charger starts you should be able to disconnect extra battery,
 
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Old 06-04-17, 02:05 PM
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Thanks, I am 45 minutes in with the jump. I'll give it an hour and see if the charger will start.
 
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Old 06-04-17, 02:35 PM
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Also, an old fashioned non-electronic charger can be used.

Do you have a master battery switch? Get in the habit turning it off when you leave the boat.
 
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Old 06-04-17, 02:56 PM
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My old iron transformer charger from the 1980's died. After an hour of paralleling the batteries, the dead one is only up to 4.46v.
 
  #6  
Old 06-04-17, 07:34 PM
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When a battery is drawn down to less than 10 volts it shortens it's life.
If there is only a couple of volts it will never get back to it's original capacity and should be replaced.
 
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Old 06-04-17, 09:18 PM
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What charger are you using? You need a charger with a manual switch on it or adjustable voltage...

You need to up the amps and volts..

I would assume its an AGM battery right?
 
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Old 06-04-17, 09:23 PM
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Or



Hook up the good battery and deeply discharged AGM battery in parallel – positive to positive and negative to negative. Do not have the charger connected to the battery or turned on at this stage.

Now, hook up the good battery to the charger. Turn on the charger. The charger will "see" the voltage of the good battery (hooked up in parallel), and start providing a charge.

After the batteries have been hooked up for about an hour, check to see if the AGM battery is slightly warm or hot to the touch. Batteries naturally become warm during charging, but excessive heat may be an indication that there really is something wrong with the battery. Discontinue charging immediately if the battery is hot to the touch. Also discontinue the process if you hear the battery "gassing" — a hissing sound coming from the safety valves. If it's hot or gassing, STOP CHARGING IMMEDIATELY!

With your voltage meter, check back often to see if the AGM battery has charged to 10.5 volts or above. This generally takes less than two hours with a 10-amp charger. If it has, disconnect the charger from the wall outlet and remove the good battery from the charger. Now, connect only the deeply discharged AGM battery to the charger. Turn on the charger and continue until the AGM battery reaches a full charge, or until the automatic charger completes the charge process. In most cases, the AGM battery will be recovered.
Optima .com .
 
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Old 06-05-17, 02:17 PM
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Mike, I thought you were a plumber. In any case the dead battery would not come up to more than 6 volts and was getting warm. My charger is an on board Minnkota, which I think requires 8 volts min. Short story, I cut my losses and replaced it this morning. Everything seems to work fine now. Today's summary: 10 bass, 4 northerns, a walleye and one very large bluegill, probably 3/4-1 lb.
 
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