Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

Boat Winterization and Bottom painting


matwell's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Feb 2001
Posts: 61
CT

10-19-01, 08:11 AM   #1  
I have a 1993 Ebbtide 19' BR, with a V6 4.3Lx Merc I/O motor. I am sick of paying over $200 to winterize the motor and replace the anods - but I am not sure how to do this myself. Can anyone help?? What needs to be done? I live in CT so the winters can be bad at times - and I need to make sure I prevent freezing. Does the prop or stern drive need to come off??

Also - I had the bottom painted with anti fouling paint last year (fist time it was done ever), now that I can see a paint line - I would like to repaint this sring myself.

Any suggestions on paint? do I need to re primne the bottom? The boat is on a trailer, so how to do I get under where the boat sits on the rollers?

Any help is appreciated....



Thanks...

 
Sponsored Links
h20frontproperty's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-01-01, 04:02 AM   #2  
h20frontproperty
Winterizing an inboard motor is a series of simple but important steps - well worth the $200 if you skip one or do something wrong. Find somebody who will work with you that has done it before, take notes and you will be ready to do it yourself next year. Some things to remember,

1) while running the engine above idle spray a can of engine storage spray through the carb until it stalls or for a couple of minutes - whatever is left in the can simply spray over the engine as a general lub/rust protection.

2) now that the engine is warm, change the oil and filter (don’t wait till the spring to change the oil) - also a good time to change the fuel filter, top up the gas tank and add fuel stabilizer. You may also want to consider a new set of plugs (that can wait till the spring and many suggest it is a better idea to change the plugs after first startup next year)

3) remove all the block drain plugs, replace them and completely fill the block with antifreeze.

4) change the oil in the rear end and replace all anodes (much cheaper than replacing what goes next).

5) there are also uv joints that requiring greasing inside the outdrive – a good idea to get at those once a year – this will require a gasket kit.

6) pressure wash the bottom but don’t bottom coat until before you launch next year – depending on the material used, read the instructions (as for painting where rollers are in the way – haul the boat out 6 or 8 inches further back than you normally would, paint – dry and then crank all the way on the trailer. Obviously don’t drive any great distances when your boat isn’t properly on it’s trailer).

Remember – if your not sure, spending the money for a pro can save you a lot when it comes to putting your boat away. It doesn’t take much cold to pop frost plugs or worse crack engines. Based on risk, materials and time - $200 doesn't sound bad. Of course, I winterize myself each year - good luck.

 
BoatMech's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Dec 1999
Posts: 592

11-01-01, 06:31 PM   #3  
Very good information, worth prionting out and keeping with your log book, I might add that antifreeze is available in an ecologcally safe variety that will aid in putting your boat back into service quickly next season. Propylene Glycol is used in RV,s. Its the latest stuff.
Scott

 
's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-07-01, 05:23 AM   #4  

CorrosionX FOR WINTER STORAGE
Eliminate springtime woes by treating your boat, motors and equipment
with CorrosionX in the fall. Here's what you do:
Outboards
• Sprav entire powerhead
• Spray all electrical connections, distributor cap
• Spray or wipe entire lower unit including propeller
• Spray lift mechanisin, linkage and levers
• Remove sparkpluns and spray into cylinder while turning motor over
• Spray starters, generators/alternators (inside if accessible)
Inboards
• Spray entire engine/generator set
• Spray all accessories
• Spray valves, through-hulls
• Spray grounded points, electrical connections
• Spray zinc bars, terminals, circuit boards, ignition switches
The Boat
• Spray or wipe metal fixtures including all stainless, brass and aluminum; rails,
stanchions, towers and fittings
• Spray antenna bases, fuse panels, connectors, circuit bearers/breakers
• Spray hinges, hatches, latches and locks
• Spray sheaves, travelers, winches
• Spray and wipe port frames
• Spray head/galley faucets and fixtures
• Spray exhaust fans/blowers
• Spray steering cables
• Spray power trim actuators, fittings, electrical connections
• Spray battery terminals
• Spray light sockets, light clips and plugs
• Spray refrigerator and air conditioning systems

To order go to http://www.corrosionx-online.com or call 607-547-1940

 
TranT's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-25-01, 08:56 AM   #5  
TranT
How to add anti-freeze to engine block

I am a new boat owner and would like to know the proper way to add anti-freeze to the engine. This is how I did but I am not really sure.

On my 1977 OMC 140 I/O boat, there are two short pieces of hoses connecting the exhaust riser to the engine thermostat block. I disconnect the "inlet" piece (through which water goes from the inlet at the lower drive to the engine block) completely from both engine and riser ends.

I then attached a 2-3 foot fill hose to the engine end and used this hose to pour anti-freeze into the engine block until the anti-freeze came out at the exhaust port on the lower drive. This way, I figured the engine block and the "exhaust" portion of the riser are filled with anti-freeze.

Then I attached the fill hose to the opening at the riser end and fill it until I see the anti-freeze level at the top of the opening.

In essence, I fill the engine block and the riser with anti-freeze. Hope to hear from you whether this is the right way to add anti-freeze for winterization. Many thanks. Tran.

 
BoatMech's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Dec 1999
Posts: 592

11-26-01, 10:27 PM   #6  
Are you draining the block first?
if you drain the block and then refill it with the mixture you could be ok.
I would recommend you try to keep a 1977 omc out of the cold.
the water in the pump tends to freeze and crack the w/p housing
in the outdrive. You could try to run it in a bucket of propylene glycol to prevent damage to the entire engine package but
you run the risk OF BURNING THE W/P IF YOU DON'T DO IT RIGHT.

 
Search this Thread