85 honda 200x atc oil question

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Old 02-16-03, 02:34 PM
JasonR73
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Question 85 honda 200x atc oil question

I have lost my manual. What type of oil is used with an 85 honda 200x 3 wheeler? Also what is the capacity?

Thanks for the help.

Jason
 
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Old 02-18-03, 03:01 PM
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Jason,

10W40 motorcycle oil (class SE or SF). Capacity after draining 34 ounces. Very important to use motorcycle oil since the (automatic) clutch runs in the oil. So you would need just over a quart.

Sandie
 
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Old 03-18-03, 07:57 PM
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The difference between automotive oil and motorcycle oil is "Friction Modifiers" that's why you use motorcycle oil, no friction modifiers.

If you want the best protection for your ATV, I would suggest AMSOIL's Ow-40 oil that is made specifically for 4 stroke ATV's. It is the best of the best

Oil Doc
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Old 03-18-03, 08:48 PM
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Motorcycle oil is overpriced and offers no more protection than other oils. In fact, informal tests have shown motorcycle oils to offer LESS protection than standard NON-energy conserving oils.

What you don't want to use is any oil marked "energy conserving", as you MIGHT experience clutch slipping.

I like Castrol GTX for my bikes.
 
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Old 03-19-03, 08:21 PM
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Would you care to post the source of these informal tests? Bottom line, if it doesn't have the "MA" logo in a white square on the back with an approval number underneath, it has NOT been shown to be safe on wet clutches.
 
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Old 03-19-03, 10:03 PM
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I'm sure a web search would turn it up for you.

Bottom line, many thousands upon thousands of motorcyclists use regular automotive oil.

I use it myself in all FOUR bikes with wet clutches (one making ~130 hp) with ZERO problems. As long as you don't use an oil marked "energy conserving", you'll be fine not paying 4x as much for "Motorcycle Oil".

Naturally, the dealer wants you to buy their oil (just like they want you to buy "thier" oil filters), but it's your money if you want to waste it.

FWIW, my 9R's manual says:
"API SE, SF or SG"
"API SH, SJ with JASO MA"

Clearly, your MA rating is only recommended with SH and SJ ratings.
 
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Old 03-20-03, 02:38 PM
Oil Doc
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After 19 Yrs of selling oil, I can tell you there is some truth to what Pendragon is saying. Just as Harley wants you to buy their oil, it is made by Sunoco (for now) , it goes out for bid (lowest price) every few years just as all the other vehicle manufacturers do. But... there are NO friction modifiers added and as in Harley's case, a few minor additives are boosted. Mostley they can say, "It has to meet this spec"

AMSOIL produces several Superior quality oils just for V-Twins, Other Motorcycles, and an oil just for ATV's. It has been run in motorcycles, Harley's included, for 30 yrs now. Harley has also come out with a synthetic oil after 30 yrs of saying "you cannot run synthetic oil". From the verbage in the advertising it appears to be Mobil 1, which is a fair product, but DO NOT extend your oil change interval using Mobil 1.
 
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Old 03-20-03, 03:39 PM
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I would like to know what actual specifications are for the "WET CLUTCHES" and what governing body and who does the performance testing on the Motor cycle oil. I need proof that there is an actual specification and that there are performance test that prove it is different that automotive oils. I believe this is all marketing hype.
 
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Old 03-20-03, 05:17 PM
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Harleys are a little different situation, as the clutch is a dry clutch, and also the engine and transmission do not share a common oil supply. The only bikes I can think of that are like this off the top of my head are H-D and BMW. Honda CRF450s have seperate engine and trans supplies but use a wet clutch. Owner's Manuals always state an alternative to purpose-specific chemicals because in some areas of the world it's not exactly feasable to hop down to the local bike shop to pick up a couple of quarts.

Of course I don't know the actual testing criteria; I don't work for the oil companies. There is a "testing process" which isn't a performance test, but rather a review of additive packages to ensure that a given oil doesn't contain additives that don't get along with wet clutches. Approved oils (and these are not approvals that are granted or denied by m/c manufacturers) are labeled with the MA logo in a white square on the back. The only problem is that there ARE oils out there which are fine...you just don't always know which ones they are, because not every maker has applied for this certification. Why would Quaker State even care about that? It's sort of like Snell Memorial Foundation approval for helmets- some companies would rather do without the approval than cough up $250,000 to have a helmet tested... because even then it might fail.

Certainly Honda, Yamaha, H-D et al do not make their own oil. It is refined to their specs by companies in that business. For example, Honda oil is Mobil oil. Mobil 1 synthetic was, for a long time, one of the only oils available in a non-motorcycle market that was recommended for use in them. Last year Mobil put a press release in Motorcycle Consumer News (similar to Consumer Reports, i.e. no ads and no bull) stating that they were changing their additive package and NO LONGER recommended their oil in wet clutch applications.

I don't really care if anyone thinks I'm being straight about this or not, after all, there is no way I will ever sell anyone who reads this a quart of oil... and anyway, I would have to sell about 5 cases to make it worth the time it has taken to answer this. Believe what you want, run what you want. But the original poster might want to consider this... an ATC200 holds about 1.5 quarts if memory serves, so that's about $1.50 extra per oil change to use the recommended stuff. A new set of clutches (including the centrifugal shoes) will cost well over $100 if they do get smoked by slippage. You do the math.

If there is a product that there's no really good reason to use, I have no problem telling my customers that. For example, Honda, Golden Spectro and others sell transmission lube made just for two-stroke engines' gearboxes. I have found that ATF does a great job in these applications and it's only about $.99 per quart to boot. I have given the same advice to plenty of customers, and I certainly wouldn't lie to somebody to sell them a stinkin' quart of oil.
 
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Old 03-24-03, 03:32 PM
Oil Doc
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The recomemdation of using the correct oil is a very good idea for what really amounts to only pennies. The "MA" spec reffered to is a JASO Spec. So if the proper spec is not listed and you do not have access to a data sheet from the oil manufacturer, a good rule would to be not trust it.

The 3 oils I mentioned earlier, manufactured by AMSOIL , outperform the JASO MA spec. and will provide you with a longer lasting engine and not that it will be noticable without a dyno, but a little more HP.

Also, AMSOIL is the only oil that you can go 3 times manufacturers change interval. That is gauranteed in writing by AMSOIL. AMSOIL is the official oil of Moto-Cross.
 
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