1982 Honda goldwing 1100 starter

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  #1  
Old 01-05-06, 10:02 AM
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1982 Honda goldwing 1100 starter

I am trying to find out where the starter is located at a 1982 Honda goldwing 1100. Also do they make repair kits for starters because when I hit the starter button it whines, once I let off of it, it will go ahead and grab and start up. Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 01-05-06, 10:44 AM
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You would do well to purchase a Clymer service and repair book for your bike. Most Goldwing starters are a real pain to work with as the engine has to be removed from the frame. Everything connected to the starter (gears and chain) will move when you remove just the starter and you will not be able to get it lined up again. Good luck.
 
  #3  
Old 01-24-06, 04:18 PM
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Starter removal is not a problem. Starter is located left side next to the shifter. Keep the bike on the side stand, and DO NOT MOVE the bike after the starter has been removed.

Disconnect battery, disconect live wire to starter. Remove mounting bolts on starter (3), pull it towards the rear of the bike and it's out. Pretty much any starter rebuild shop should have the bits and pieces to rebuild it.

There is absolutely no need to pull the motor!!!!
 
  #4  
Old 03-07-06, 01:47 PM
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Starter repair.

Kylie is absolutely correct. I just did a starter repair on my 82 1100 Interstate. There is no need to remove anything to get at the starter. It is mounted down low on the left side of the bike. It is tucked in behind the exhaust, so it is not obvious until you get down there to look, but no special tools or anything are required. I am not a professional mechanic; just a guy who doesn't want to pay a professional mechanic union scale to do simple jobs that I could handle.

My starter was doing the same thing yours sounds like it is doing. That is typical of older Hondas with the "pancake four engine." A few things are common problems. The brushes wear down and need replacing. This is pretty simple once you get the starter off. Another problem is that the stator wears down or the grooves between them fill with carbon and begins to short out. This can be fixed by cleaning out the grooves with a hacksaw blade and reassembling the starter. Again, not a very complex task if you keep track of the order parts came off.

One final problem that is common is for the starter solenoid to wear out. Most of the time it isn't really worn out so much as the contact surfaces inside the solenoid get pitted on one side and get chunks of copper built up on the opposing side from a process called "chunk emission." When the starter button is engaged, the electricity from the battery turns the solenoid into an electromagnet which forces an iron shaft in the solenoid to push the copper contacts together. As the copper contact surfaces come together a spark jumps across the gap and another spark forms as the contact surfaces seperate when the switch is released. Each time it happens, a tiny amount of copper moves from one side to the other much like a welders rod transfers metal from the stinger to the welded surface. Over time, the surfaces are no longer smooth and the solenoid is less and less efficient because the copper surfaces cannot form a close fit. This causes a voltace drop and the starter has les and less voltage to turn the engine. Eventually, it quits altogether. A new Solenoid will cost about $70.00. Taking the old one apart and filing the contact surfaces smooth takes about a half hour and gives you the same results. That is like getting paid about $140.00 per hour. It is considerably more than I make teaching psychology at a small college. There are a couple of goldwing chat lines that give more details on the process. If you need more info, let me know.

I was really amazed how much better my goldwing starts after cleaning up the stator and the solenoid.
 
  #5  
Old 03-13-06, 09:15 PM
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Thanks

Thanks so much for the information, it will help me very much and save me money.
Originally Posted by yodan
Kylie is absolutely correct. I just did a starter repair on my 82 1100 Interstate. There is no need to remove anything to get at the starter. It is mounted down low on the left side of the bike. It is tucked in behind the exhaust, so it is not obvious until you get down there to look, but no special tools or anything are required. I am not a professional mechanic; just a guy who doesn't want to pay a professional mechanic union scale to do simple jobs that I could handle.

My starter was doing the same thing yours sounds like it is doing. That is typical of older Hondas with the "pancake four engine." A few things are common problems. The brushes wear down and need replacing. This is pretty simple once you get the starter off. Another problem is that the stator wears down or the grooves between them fill with carbon and begins to short out. This can be fixed by cleaning out the grooves with a hacksaw blade and reassembling the starter. Again, not a very complex task if you keep track of the order parts came off.

One final problem that is common is for the starter solenoid to wear out. Most of the time it isn't really worn out so much as the contact surfaces inside the solenoid get pitted on one side and get chunks of copper built up on the opposing side from a process called "chunk emission." When the starter button is engaged, the electricity from the battery turns the solenoid into an electromagnet which forces an iron shaft in the solenoid to push the copper contacts together. As the copper contact surfaces come together a spark jumps across the gap and another spark forms as the contact surfaces seperate when the switch is released. Each time it happens, a tiny amount of copper moves from one side to the other much like a welders rod transfers metal from the stinger to the welded surface. Over time, the surfaces are no longer smooth and the solenoid is less and less efficient because the copper surfaces cannot form a close fit. This causes a voltace drop and the starter has les and less voltage to turn the engine. Eventually, it quits altogether. A new Solenoid will cost about $70.00. Taking the old one apart and filing the contact surfaces smooth takes about a half hour and gives you the same results. That is like getting paid about $140.00 per hour. It is considerably more than I make teaching psychology at a small college. There are a couple of goldwing chat lines that give more details on the process. If you need more info, let me know.

I was really amazed how much better my goldwing starts after cleaning up the stator and the solenoid.
 
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