New Norton's?

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Old 04-08-06, 06:20 PM
dkpbxman's Avatar
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New Norton's?

As a kid I fell in love with Norton motorcycles. Never got around to getting one, unfortunately.
I understand they went out of business while I was growing up and have recently become available again.

What's the quality like on the new models?

Always wanted a Commando, think they were 750's back then?

If I remember right-they, Triumphs and other English bikes had problems with oil leaks-do they still?
 
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Old 04-12-06, 08:57 AM
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New Nortons

Hi, I have never rode a Norton but with the technology of today I would say they are probably a well built bike.
There is a fellow in Glenville, New York who is a master with Nortons, Triumphs and BSA. Give him a call.
M&S Cycle {518}-377-7980

Bikes don't leak oil, their just marking their spot.

Best regards, Jeff Z.
 
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Old 04-12-06, 11:18 AM
vmweenie
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Soft spot for Nortons

Originally Posted by dkpbxman
As a kid I fell in love with Norton motorcycles. Never got around to getting one, unfortunately.
I understand they went out of business while I was growing up and have recently become available again.

What's the quality like on the new models?

Always wanted a Commando, think they were 750's back then?

If I remember right-they, Triumphs and other English bikes had problems with oil leaks-do they still?
Yeah, me too. There were a lot of models over the years - if you're about my age then yes, there was a 750 Commando. In the early to mid 70's the 750 became an 850. They had a Roadster model and an Interstate model which, as I recall, was a Roadster with a larger tank.

I've ridden quite a few over the years; my favorite was the Dunstall 750 "cafe racer". Sweet.

The Nortons were the easiest bikes in their class to ride fast - so much so that quite a few people crashed them because they didn't realize how fast they were going. The four cylinder Japanese bikes were generally more reliable, (I'll skip the obligatory Lucas joke) and made more power. But there was nothing that could keep up with the Norton on the mountain roads.

The 750 and 850 twins had a 360 degree crank - at idle, you could strap a can of paint to it and get better mixing than the hardware store machine. Above 2000 revs or so, the rubber engine mounts would come into play - it was *almost* as smooth as a BMW boxer then. Those bushings did require some very careful adjustments though. In fact, the whole driveline was rubber isolated. Which made following a Norton through the twisties a wierd experience - it looks the the frame moves independently from the swing-arm.

The "new" Norton has a 270 degree crank - what the hell are they thinking? I'm sure the new bike is more reliable, and probably more powerful, and so on and so on but c'mon! I don't think they should be allowed to call it a Norton.

There's a review (more like a preview) in the current issue on on the mags - don't know which one; I read it while waiting for coffee.
 
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