Muratic Acid for rust in a gas tank

Reply

  #1  
Old 06-12-08, 07:59 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 5
Muratic Acid for rust in a gas tank

The gas tank on my ATV had a lot of pin holes in it, sanded down the outside and applied layers of fiberglass soaked in resin. Prior to that I placed pea gravel in the tank and spent 2 days shaking the pebbles around knocking loose the rust inside. Now the inside is about as clean as I can get it. Now to my question......plan to use either muratic acid cut 50/50 inside the tank to do a job on the rust, or was considering navel jelly inside the tank. If muratic acid is suggested by a reader, then after a few min. with acid inside I would flush, neutralize w/baking soda, flush again and WD40 the inside to keep rust away. If navel jelly is a better choice give me some suggestions. Would the muratic acid effect the fiberglass matting/gel that I put on the outside. How about navel jelly....remember some of the pin holes are as large as 1/16" in dia. I don't plan on coating the inside of the tank after either of the above methods, just fill with gas and go....I hope.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-12-08, 08:07 PM
nap's Avatar
nap
nap is offline
New Member
Join Date: May 2006
Location: north
Posts: 4,163
well, just a though but if you are going to put gas in it, what do you think the wd 40 is going to do for you?

You would be much better off using something such as this product
 
  #3  
Old 06-15-08, 10:46 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
I also have had good results with a small mail chain and Purple Power. Shake it around and empty it. You don't have to worry about lubrication, as the gas will provide that.
 
  #4  
Old 06-15-08, 11:28 AM
GregH's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 9,675
It is never good to use muriatic/sulphuric acid as a prep or cleaner for steel.

Muriatic acid is good at dissolving rust but will just as vigorously eat steel.
It also is difficult to neutralize and baking soda is not good enough to neutralize and ready the metal for paint.

What you need is phosphoric acid and is the main ingredient of Naval Jelly.
Phosphoric only attacks the rust and after any slight residue after rinsing will help paint bond.

One big problem with Naval Jelly is that its acid strength is not as great as muriatic so it takes more patience.
 
  #5  
Old 06-15-08, 12:19 PM
wobweeder's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 29
First of all, I'm at a loss to know of any ATV manufacturer who uses Metal Gas Tanks... OK, maybe Honda on one or two old 3 wheelers... although I'm pretty sure THEY were plastic as well... hmmmm...

Apart from that, are you sure this is original equipment? Or did someone [email protected] a motorcycle tank onto an ATV frame?

Gas tanks are nothing to fool around with. If you want to keep a metal tank on your ATV (and I haven't a clue why??) fabricate one from new sheet metal. See if you can buy one on Ebay.

If one of your 'patches' lets loose from a tree-branch stab, you'll be transformed into a human torch. I don't know about anyone else, but that would ruin my whole day.

I only use Muratic acid only to dissolve or etch Concrete. In contact with metal, it is NASTY. If I wanted to remove rust for preservation purposes, I would use a light plating solution and lots of electricity.
 
  #6  
Old 06-15-08, 01:03 PM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 20,937
"Phosphoric prep and etch" by kleen-strip, from most paint stores or dept's is what I use for rust. Works great for nuts, bolts, brackets, etc, that I need to re-use. Used to get a lime remover from a restaurant supply store (used in the industrial style dishwashers) which was mostly phosphoric acid, but none of those around here.
 
  #7  
Old 06-20-08, 06:13 AM
santawatt's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 10
Hmm, on my motorbike I cleaned the thank inside by placing a clean bicylce chain in it, put some gasoline inside and began to shake it a lot. Afterwards I repeated the process with new gasoline inside and 5 small neckchains from ID-cards, (you know, those made of lots of metallica spheres connected to each other).
Shook the tank like crazy, my firend helped me out too, because you get tired all alone.

And yes, it works.
 
  #8  
Old 09-19-09, 03:16 PM
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Illinois
Posts: 1
First inspect the tank. If there is a lot of sediment in the tank that will need to be cleaned first; Drop a chain into the tank. Try a chain that is almost as wide as the filler hole, about two or three feet. Use oven cleaner and spray about a third of the can into the tank with the chain. Shake, shake, shake. Let stand for about 15min. Fill the tank with water and decant. Repeat this procedure until the all of the thick syrupy junk is gone from the tank. Remove the chain. Then you can try this. Take a handfull of sand and put it in the tank. Take a high pressure power washer and insert the tip into the tank. Blast away. Let the sand and water swirl and scrub for you. Decant, inspect repeat. Next step. Inspect the inside of the tank with a LED gooseneck light or use a standard flashlight. If you see too much rust then use this method to remove the rust; Muriatic acid may work but I believe it is too fast acting and will also react with the clean metal. A more efficient acid to use is Oxalic acid in crystal form. It is slower to clean but will not attack the clean metal. Make a quart mixture with water and pour it in the gas tank. Fill the remainder of the tank with water, top off. Let it stand for a day. Pour it out and inspect the tank. If more cleaning is needed repeat the procedure until satisfaction. Final step. Rinse the tank until all sand is out. Place a paper filter between the tank and carb for added filtering. - Best Always, Ben[/FONT][/FONT]
 
  #9  
Old 09-19-09, 04:17 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Eastern Georgia
Posts: 486
Go to your local yamaha dealer and get a yahama rust remover kit, comes with an acid(nitric acid I think) and a neturalizer. Put the acid in, diluted with water as per instructions, soak overnight, empty out rinse with water. Add neuturalizer, swirl around, soak, empty out dryout gas and go. Just that simple.
 
  #10  
Old 09-24-09, 09:28 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: santa fe /texas
Posts: 998
Originally Posted by wire twister View Post
Go to your local yamaha dealer and get a yahama rust remover kit, comes with an acid(nitric acid I think) and a neturalizer. Put the acid in, diluted with water as per instructions, soak overnight, empty out rinse with water. Add neuturalizer, swirl around, soak, empty out dryout gas and go. Just that simple.
at one time (10+ years ago) my local yahama dealer had a kit that amounted to cleaning the inside/then mixing an epoxy type liquid -pour it in tank-roll tank around while it setts up.
tank was yellow inside after treatment.
 
  #11  
Old 09-24-09, 02:17 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Eastern Georgia
Posts: 486
That is called a Creme kit and is still available, use it after using the rust remover kit. Creme kit will seal small pinholes in the tank.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'