Spraybooth

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  #1  
Old 02-17-09, 06:02 PM
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Spraybooth

I'm considering building a spraybooth in my garage. I am a carpenter by trade, so I know all the framing and finishing aspects of building the walls, drywall, etc. My problem is that I need advice about the CFM exhaust fan. I've been hearing that if I spray with urethane paints, I would need an explosion-proof fan. My room is going to be approximately 5 feet wide by 8 feet long and 7 feet high. I'm stuck as to what type of door to use for entry (maybe a solid door with a louver to allow air flow?). But I need to find out what size fan is going to be cut and installed on one of the exterior walls. Can I use a regular flourescent light fixture if I seal it with plexy glass inside the room? These are all legitimate concerns of mine because I have a family and that comes first. So I want to make sure that if I do this, I do it the right way. Please help with any advice. Thank you.

Sincerely,
250rear
 
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Old 02-18-09, 09:51 AM
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Is this a temporary booth to spray one job or will it be permanant? Do you want a decent booth to spray some cabinets or a great booth for a show winning classic car?

As for how much air I think your budget will be the limit. I have seen commercial booths where both side walls are solid air inlet and outlet so the air in the room is changed several times a minute which takes a lot of fan power, energy and money.

No matter what you are painting you can never have enough light. Get too many lights and then double them. Point sources like a few quartz lights can be blinding and cast hard shaddows. I like long rows of fluorescents.
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I've built a temporary booth with plastic sheeting. Because the walls were only sheet plastic I could not control the flow of air into the booth very well. I had filters for the air to enter but they were enough a restriction that much air was drawn underneath and around my sheeting (I had a frame to hold it up, but the plastic just draped onto the floor). The booth was inside my large warehouse and I hosed down all the floor area several times and right before painting to control dust. Dust was minimized but still present and the wet floor really raised the humidity at the start of spraying and the humidity dropped during the entire spray operation which caused other difficulties. My lights were outside the booth in clean air and shining through the plastic walls. I had six twin bulb 8' fluorescents, two 500w quarts lights and four 150w regular light bulbs and still wanted more light and was always moving around to get a light to reflect off the surface to check the finish.
 
  #3  
Old 02-25-09, 10:45 AM
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thanks pilot dane but this is going to be permanent. the room is going to be built in my garage with one exterior wall and the other three are going to be framed. I want to get this right i need some directions on fans, filters etc. I plan to install a full louverd door for fresh air. rooom size 5wide 8 long 7 high i have a family so i want to play it safe. thanks sincerely rear 250.
 
  #4  
Old 03-21-09, 06:40 PM
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Is anyone alive. can you hear me booth spray booth.you guys are looking but not writting back. pilot dane r u here with us hello come back. peace 250 rear.
 
  #5  
Old 03-22-09, 06:01 AM
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You have not mentioned a budget but if you want it to be safe plan on using explosion proof fans and light fixtures.

Pick vent fans (however many and big you can afford) that can generate a bit of vacuum/back pressure to overcome the resistance of the filters that will be covering the louvered door.

If you check with industrial suppliers spray booth filters are available in a variety of sizes, shapes and efficiencies. To keep it easy you might want to use a series of cheap furnace filters.

If you want to save some money you can build windows into the sides and top of your booth and use regular lighting fixtures.

Since you are going to the trouble of building a real booth you might as well invest in a forced air breathing system (instead of a cartridge respirator) so you can spray any kind of paint.
 
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Old 03-22-09, 06:54 AM
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you only have 280 cubic feet of air to change so that's not a big problem. you should have your filtered inlets at the top of the structure and your exaust at the bottom. preferably at opposite ends. this keeps clean air at work hight. an induction type fan motor would be safe enough as there are no brushes to arc.
 
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