Cushman front suspension

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  #1  
Old 10-07-18, 08:12 PM
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Cushman front suspension

I have a 1963 Cushman Golfster Model 735. It has just one front wheel with a spring suspension similar to a Motorcycle. There are two bushings on either side of the wheel (parts of the suspension, not the wheel bearings) that have individual grease zerks for scheduled maintenance. It is very hard to get these bushings to take grease, It takes everything I have on a manual grease gun to lubricate them, and they just laugh at an air powered gun. Is taking the suspension apart my only option for making them accept grease more easily?
 
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Old 10-08-18, 06:15 AM
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Have you tried replacing the Zerk fittings? Maybe their check valve is jammed or rusted shut.
 
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Old 10-08-18, 08:15 AM
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Cushman Zerk Fittings

If you saw where the fittings were stuck down in a hole between two thick metal pieces, you would understand why I have not replaced them. If I have to go that route (and remember that I CAN get grease thru them to the necessary metal on metal parts where it is supposed to go) I bet those fittings have been in there 50 years, so it will probably take some sun surface heat to get them out. Before I did that, I wanted to get your take on it....
 
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Old 11-01-18, 11:39 AM
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While I am letting those fittings soak in PB Blaster, I am trying to locate a company that will supply me with a generic canopy, windshield and zipper doors to make it usable this winter. Lots of cabs for current manufacuturers, but none so far for antiques like mine. any clues from you gentlemen?
 
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Old 11-01-18, 01:58 PM
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Just search golf cart suppliers online. I don't think you'll find many options though. There weren't many made and after 55 years there aren't enough left to support aftermarket products. But old carts like that are perfect DIY projects.

I had a local welding shop make a top out of aluminum. They used 1/8" thick sheet and bent the edges over 1" to form a reinforcing lip. Then I used spray adhesive to attach sound deadening foam from Amazon to the bottom. It's lightweight, waterproof and works really well.

A windshield can be made from Plexi, acrylic or Lexan. You can buy it by the sheet in various sizes and thicknesses. It's easily cut with a router or circular saw and the edges are easy to sand smooth and if you want a crystal clear edge lightly hit it with a propane torch. If you want to put bends in it lay it on a table and evenly heat the bend area with a heat gun. Then use a board to evenly press on the sheet to make the bend you want. Hold it in position until it cools and the bend will be permenant.

It's an old cart. Get creative and have fun with making it into what you want.
 
  #6  
Old 11-01-18, 02:25 PM
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I have been shopping for the items you used already, and once I have all the stuff, I even have a local upholstery shop ready to take the skeleton I build to the next level of canvas and clear plastic. I am debating on whether to use round aluminum conduit or square aluminum maybe 1"X1". I can to straight up with the windshield, and lowes will cut it to my size. Did you bolt your windshield to the frame or put it on with a plastic clamp of some type? Did you put the insulation on the top for strength or sound deadening? I Like the welding shop press idea lot. Thanks for the road map, You should post a picture of it!
 

Last edited by WML13; 11-01-18 at 02:31 PM. Reason: Spelling
  #7  
Old 11-02-18, 06:16 AM
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It is almost impossible to get the roof supports to be rigid without adding too much weight so expect some movement. My windshield folds down so I have it mounted loosely in a slot so at the canopy frame twists and racks it doesn't put stress on the plexi. If you want your windshield to be fixed then you can mount it rigidly and have it provide some stiffness to the canopy. If you do that I would use double sided tape to fist stick the windscreen to the frame then folllow up with screws about every 9-12" around the perimeter.

Be careful with the edges and any holes in your windscreen. A scratch or chip at the edge or in a screw hole can be a stress riser to eventually cause a crack. There are special plastic drill bits or you can just use regular drills and carefully step up in size as needed. As you near your final hole size drill it one size too small. Then use the correct drill size and run it backwards at high speed. Let the friction heat and melt it's way through the plastic which will "finish" the holes edges.
 
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Old 11-02-18, 10:39 AM
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Sounds like a plan! it all makes sense to me!

Thanks! On another subject would you guys have a source for a part number for a set of wheel weights for a 1978 Simplicity Landlord model 1690333? I have it all ready for snow removal with tire chains and a Blade in front, but thought wheel weights might improve its performance.
 
  #9  
Old 11-02-18, 11:43 AM
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Just search the internet for tractor wheel weights. They are a pretty generic item and can be ordered by the diameter and weight that you want.
 
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