Propane or Charcoal Smoker?

 

  #1  
Old 09-14-03, 09:59 PM
Dale
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Question Propane or Charcoal Smoker?

I just wondering witch one is better? any feedback is very welcome.

Thank you!
 
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Old 09-16-03, 08:45 PM
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You will probably hear a lot in favor of one or the other, but I personally can't say I have a preference. In fact, I use my Geo. Foreman grill more than anything, but do own a charcoal grill that rarely gets used except by my brother-in-law.

If you enjoy a truly smokey flavor to your foods then I would recommend a charcoal grill. If you just enjoy cooking out and love grilled foods, then a propane grill would be perfect.

If you opt for a propane grill and want the smoke taste to a certain food, then add a little liquid smoke. Just remember, a little liquid smoke goes a long way!

Kay
 
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Old 09-17-03, 05:34 AM
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Really depends on amount of usage. Being a smoker you wouldn't use it as often as a grill. I prefer charcoal for a smoker.
 
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Old 09-17-03, 06:12 AM
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Okay, you can tell how much I cook. What is the difference between a smoker and a grill? Is it like comparing a fry pan to a crockpot?

Kay
 
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Old 09-26-03, 12:23 PM
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a grill usually has the fire under the food and cooks pretty fast. a smoker has the fire box on the side and cooks very slow such as when cooking a brisket. the side cooker aliows the heat and the smoke to draft through the cooking area leaving the smoke flavor in the meat.
 
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Old 09-26-03, 10:58 PM
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I would say that if you are asking the question...propane or charcoal for a smoker...it sounds like you may be a rookie from the getgo. I advise a propane grill 'cause you probably wouldn't get enough use out of a smoker. It is a sort of art and some science. You gotta light a fire and keep it at a fairly constant temp for several hours if not all day. On top of that, you would use real wood for a smoker. Pecan, citrus, mesquite maybe oak or hickory on occasion. Some science, the wrong wood burning makes the food taste BAD. For instance...chix with citrus wood or beef with a hickory. Get a book on the subject.
 
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Old 06-16-04, 12:53 PM
regiopazzo
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i think you mean grill...

I have to agree with Guiness... I think you meant to ask which is better between propane and charcoal grills. Do you want to be able to whip out some grilled hot dogs and hamburgers in an hour or are you going to be cooking beef briscuits and pork shoulders over periods of 10+ hours? I'd recommend that when you go shopping, ask to look at grills. Like someone already said, some people swear up and down by one or the other, but both have advantages, and it's really tough if not impossible to argue that one is clearly better than the other when it comes to propane or charcoal. I like charcoal, but only because I love the smell of burning coals in a grill!

good luck!
 
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Old 01-14-05, 04:40 PM
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by a combo unit.. I still like the charcoal and real wood method of grilling, bbq'ing, or smoking.. a little more work, but the end result is well worth it.. and with a combo, you get the best of both worlds, a grill and/or smoker...
 
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Old 01-15-05, 01:07 AM
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Are you serious????????? It has been 1.5 years!!!!
 
  #10  
Old 01-17-05, 09:14 AM
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I finally noticed when this was originally posted.. guess these things don't purge themselves after a set time?.. well, by now the other one is well broke in, so what did he finally get?...
 
  #11  
Old 03-07-05, 04:55 PM
slo5oh
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Originally Posted by Dale
I just wondering witch one is better? any feedback is very welcome.

Thank you!
I recently purchased a propane smoker, and I can tell you it's easy as hell. I made some pulled pork this weekend (since it's hard to mess up this cut) and my temp floated between 200 and 300 for hours until I finally figured out where to set the flame (a hair above med) and the top (100%) and bottom vents (closed as far as she allows, about 25% I'd say). It took about 16 hours but the meat finally went past 180* (one was just under 190*, the other 185*) I followed the "mr. brown's" instructions over at virtualweberbullet.com and the meat is everything I hoped for. Next it's time for some ribs
 

Last edited by slo5oh; 03-15-05 at 01:51 PM.
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Old 03-14-05, 08:27 PM
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I don't think thats smoking tho..? smoking is below 170 degrees, kippering is above, and b-b-q.. that's above that...
 
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Old 03-15-05, 01:49 PM
slo5oh
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Originally Posted by frhrwa
I don't think thats smoking tho..? smoking is below 170 degrees, kippering is above, and b-b-q.. that's above that...
From http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/ :
under Pork Butt - The Renowned Mr. Brown:
Here are some pork butt photos I took on October 3, 1999 when I prepared the "The Renowned Mr. Brown" recipe from the classic book "Smoke & Spice" by Cheryl Alters Jamison and Bill Jamison. This is one of my favorite recipes for pork butt, and if you haven't tried it yet, you should!
My plan was to cook at 250F to an internal temperature of 170-180F, as called for in the recipe. (Most people feel that pork butt should be cooked to an internal temp of 170-185F for sliced pork and 190-205F for pulled pork. Choose your temperature accordingly.)
Under Baby Back Ribs:
Cook ribs at 225F for 3 hours, turn slabs, then increase cooker temp to 250-275F and cook an additional 1-2 hours until done.

I'm sure there are times when I will want a lower temp, but with my flame nob a hair above medium the temp is about 250. I think making jerky takes temps around 180 or so.
The meat still has to cook.
 
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Old 03-19-05, 10:28 PM
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guess that's the difference that "time" makes... it takes time to do a cold smoke.. smoke houses leave the meat in the hanger for a long time, they don't just put it in and take it out in a few hours.. that's cookin with smoke added..
 
 

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